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Category: baby name Finnegan

February names

By Denise K. Potter

There’s more to February than roses and chocolates. It’s also Black History Month plus the month that hosts Presidents’ Birthday and Groundhog Day – and let’s not forget Ferris Wheel Day and Polar Bear Day. Whether you’re naming a baby this February or just looking for more ways to celebrate, here are ten ideas themed to the second month of the year. And none of them are Cupid.

Amethyst – The birthstone of babies born in February was worn by ancient Romans and Greeks in the belief that it protected against intoxication. Today, Amethyst can be used as a girl’s name, along with Violet, the official flower of February. Another gem name associated with February is Pearl, as the Finnish call February The Month of the Pearl, a much lovelier designation than the English nicknames mud month or kale month.

BradyMatthew B. Brady, celebrated American photographer of the 19th century, took the first photograph of a U.S. President in Office in February 1849 and left a powerful legacy in documenting much of the Civil War. Today, Brady is a popular Irish boys’ name.

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The Nameberry 9: Back to Basics?

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Appellation Mountain‘s Abby Sandel wonders if maybe we’re overthinking the naming process, and in this week’s The Nameberry 9 she gives some examples of celebs who have gone back to basics.

Has it really become harder to name a child?

It seems to be the theme in recent days.  Over at Offbeat Mama, Caitlin wrote about her struggles to name – and eventually rename – her youngest child.  The New Zealand Herald reported the same thing, noting a 12% increase in parents filing to legally change a child’s name prior to his or her second birthday.

My maternal grandparents named their first three children in accordance with family and cultural custom.  My dad’s mom, undecided, pulled his middle name out of a hat.  As for my parents, they felt no obligation to honor anyone, and chose short, peppy, upbeat names for their three daughters – until along came a son, and suddenly, family names mattered.  If any child ever went nameless for months, or if aunts were divided over accusations of name theft, I’ve never heard the tale.

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F-name

Once more this year the list of most popular names—particularly for girls—is vowel –heavy, with six of the top ten names starting with A, E, I or O, and five more filling out the top twenty.

As a result, naturally, there are fewer consonant-starters visible, some letters practically non-existent.  One of these is F, with only a single  representative, Faith, in the top 100, and a grand total of nine girls’ names out of the whole list of top 1000.

If we look back a century—testing the 100-year rule–it was a very different story, with 31 girls’ and 34 boys’ names starting with this initial.  Several of them were versions of the same name (variant spellings are nothing new!); for instance, Freda, Frieda, Freida and Freeda all made the list—but not the current Kahlo-influenced FridaFlorence—no longer visible on today’s list–was represented in 1910 by Florance, Flora, Flossie, Flo, Florrie and Florene, and Frances (which hangs on at #802 today, with Francesca at 470) showed up in such variations as Fannie, Fanny, Francis, Francisca and Frankie, and there were three spellings of Fay/Faye/Fae.

Among the more unusual choices that made the girls’ list a hundred years ago were Fairy, Floy and Fronie.

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