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Category: baby name Elsie

starba2013

By Linda Rosenkrantz

We haven’t quite kissed 2013 goodbye yet, but we’re close enough to have gotten a pretty good picture of the year’s celebrity baby naming landscape, enough to pick out our personal faves—and to give you the reasons why.  Here are our Top 12 choices—some from A-list celebs, others who are not so well known—from the worlds of film, TV and sports.

Winnie RoseJimmy and Nancy Fallon went up to the attic to pick this vintage treasure. Turns out the name was chosen by the couple in honor of the lake where they frequently vacationed and even got engaged at: New Hampshire’s Lake Winnipesaukee, but, said Fallon, ‘Winnipesaukee’s a little long, Also, she’s a ‘win’ for us. He added that the Wonder Years connotation makes the name even better –“Winnie is the coolest girl on TV ever.”

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names that start with D and E

The Nameberry 9 by Abby Sandel of Appellation Mountain

From Alexander to Alivia, the letter A has dominated baby names in recent years.

This past week was different.  Could we be ushering in a new era of D and E names?  Or is it just coincidence that three celeb birth announcements for baby boys started with the letter D this week?

With favorites like Ella and Emma, it comes as no surprise that the letter E is currently the fifth most popular letter for girls’ given names in the US.  For boys, D ranked #5 last year (behind J, A, C, and M) while E came in at #8.

What does that mean for expectant parents?  If you’re after a truly stand-out name, it might be worth considering a lesser-used initial, like H, T, O, or F.  Alternately, a really unusual name, like Avalon or Arden, isn’t so strange when lots of little girls are answering to Ava and Allison.

D and E names could hit that sweet spot – familiar, but not overused.  Or they could be catching on, ready to eclipse A in the next few years.

Now, on to those great D and E baby names in news:

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nickname Millie

Thank you, Jimmy Fallon, for naming your new daughter Winnie Rose, and proving our point— which is that we’re into a whole new era of nickname names.  These are worlds away from midcentury short forms like Cindy and Mindy and Marci and Lori, but go further back in time to faded Victorian favorites. It’s a trend that started in the UK, where 10% of the current Top 100 girls’ names fit this description, and several of the boys— Alfie, Archie, Freddie, Ollie—rank high as well.  Here are some of the vintage girls’ nickname names, with their uniquely charming combo of sentiment and sass, which illustrate the trend.

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britflorence

Eleanor Nickerson, of the wonderful blog British Baby Names, offers her predictions of the names that will succeed today’s trendiest in England and Wales.

The Next Olivia

Olivia was the supreme queen of girls’ names in 2008, 2009 and 2010 in England and Wales, and was only marginally beaten by Amelia to the number 1 spot in 2011. It entered the Top 100 for the first time in the late 1980s, and has been in the Top 10 since 1999. Further down the ranks, Eliza stands at #62.  Like Olivia before, Eliza has not ranked in the Top 100 for a century, but is now steadily rising.

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Fourteen Shades of Elizabeth

elizblog2

The royal and biblical Elizabeth accounted for approximately a quarter of all girls’ names in early Britain, and when she emigrated to Colonial America, close to the same percentage of all girl babies were christened with that name— sometimes even more than one in a family. So it’s no wonder that numerous nicknames would pop up to distinguish among all the Elizabeths– several of which would go on to be used as independent names.
Of course Elizabeth itself is a wonderfully elegant classic, but here are some of the most appealing variations on the Elizabethan theme.

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