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My friend Kim loved the name Cordelia.  This was in my pre-Nameberry days, and Cordelia‘s been off the Top 1000 since 1950: It certainly wasn’t a name that it occurred to me to love.

Still…..Cordelia.  The more I thought about it, the more I loved Cordelia.  Thanks, Kim, for the tip.

I might have liked Cordelia had I found it in a book or met someone with that name, but I believe my friend Kim‘s love for the name made me love it more.  I admire Kim‘s taste in all things, from clothes to home decor to art.  So if she loved Cordelia, I gave it more credibility as a wonderful, undiscovered name.

Other friends have influenced me to love the names Eliza and Daisy, affection I’ve passed on to the visitors of Nameberry and undoubtedly to more than a few baby girls.

What name have you come to love because a friend loved it….or even a virtual Nameberry friend?

Or maybe you read about a name here or on another blog or site and that made you fall in love….

What name did someone else make you love, who made you love it, and why?

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Beach Baby Names

georgia-beach

This summer, the ocean’s influence can be found in the latest and coolest baby names, both unusual and traditional. Whether it’s the sandy dunes off the shore, the seaweed that washes up in the waves, or even the ancient gods and goddesses who controlled the seas, these fresh new baby names all allude to the extraordinary appeal of the coast.Here are a few of the coolest new beach-inspired baby names:

Beach- This boys’ name could pay homage to the 1950’s American boy-band The Beach Boys or be an evocative choice for hard-core beach lovers.

Cordelia- Meaning “heart; daughter of the sea,” Cordelia’s origin is Latin and Celtic. In Shakespeare’s tragedy King Lear, Cordelia was the King’s youngest and favorite daughter. Though a bit grown up sounding, it also yields the fresh nicknames Cora, Delia, Del, Lia, and Cory.

Doris- This female name is Greek, meaning “gift of the ocean.” A longtime grandma name, Doris is not quite back but could make a Geek Chic choice for the adventurous parent.

Dune- A unisex name! Dune can also allude to the science-fiction franchise stemming from Frank Herbert’s 1965 novel.

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moon-dreams

When we think of names related to the moon our first thoughts would probably be Luna, or the Zappa-esque Moon, or one of the ancient goddesses of the moon—Phoebe, Artemis, Diana, or Selene.

But what about the names of actual moons, of some of the many satellites rotating around the planets?  Luckily for us namebodies, many of their names were taken from ancient Greek mythological figures (several after lovers of Zeus)–particularly those around Jupiter and Saturn– while the names of Uranus’s twenty-seven moons have a decidedly Shakespearean bent.

Here, the Nameberry Picks of the best lunar names:

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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The time has rolled around again when I get to do one of my favorite things—browse through the Birth Announcement Forum and get to see a snapshot of the gorgeous names Berries have chosen over these past three months–the latest installment of Baby Names 2012.  Because each quarter they seem to be more and more impressive and inventive, and this one is no exception, with many great first and middle combos and interesting sibsets as well.

It’s just so gratifying to see the final results of all the Nameberry advice and discussion—ours and especially the wise, measured opinions of fellow Berries  —  a fantastic mix of the classic and the creative, from Elizabeth to Arrow for a girl, Jack and John to Calder and Cato for boys.  Not to mention a veritable botanical garden of flower and tree names—Primrose, Tulip, Rose, Iris, Violet, Lilac, Jacinda, Maple and Olive, as well as a Flora, a Blossom and a Bloom.

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detectv

Hear the words ‘detective’ or ‘private eye,’ and you probably picture a tough guy like Mickey Spillane or a cooler customer like Sam Spade.  But it turns out that mystery fiction also features a lot more female sleuths than you might think, dating back to Loveday Brooke in the 1890s and coming right up to today.

It’s interesting to note how many of these earlier crime-solvers were given “ladylike” professions as covers—either as antique dealers or esoteric academics –or the more modern wedding planners or pet sitters.  It wasn’t—for the most part—till the TV era, that they would become career private or police investigators.

One thing that they do have in common though is some pretty fantastic first names, and here are some of the best.

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