Category: baby name compromise

Boy Baby Names: A time for compromise

Baby name compromise

They don’t know if it’s a boy or a girl, but they do know the names – or they did. Now friends have chosen their top boy baby name, and it’s back to the drawing board for Anna and her husband.

Anna writes:

We’ve got a bit of a dilemma on our hands, and I’m hoping you can help.

Our older two are Daphne Rose and Charles Ender.

We love old-fashioned yet less common first names (literary or Biblical) paired with family names for the middle name.

Since the baby is due on the Ides of March, I like the idea of Julius Caesar, Shakespeare, or Latin-sounding names.

While my husband and I love the name Juliet Mae if this next baby is a girl, we simply cannot agree on a name for a boy. I think his ideas are too common, and he thinks mine are too unusual.

Some names I like are Corin, Julian, Bennet, and Silas. Some names he likes include Mark, Aaron, Noah, and Asher. Family names for the middle name could be Cole, Treloar, Woods, Birk, James, and Ray.

We thought we had agreed on the name Gideon Cole, but close friends just named their son Gideon.

Please help! I’m so sick of searching endlessly through literary, old-fashioned, and Biblical name lists!

The Name Sage replies:

Read More

a Name Sage post by: Abby View all Name Sage posts

Amanda writes:

We are expecting our second child on February 16th, exactly two years after we welcomed our daughter, Evelina Viti. She goes by Lina. We chose not to find out the gender again this time, but it is making choosing a name that much harder!

Evelina’s middle name is from my husband’s family, which is very Italian. Our last name is Italian, too, and ends in ‘o’.

If Evelina had been a boy, we had chosen Byron Robert. Now that we have Evelina, we feel that Byron doesn’t work. It’s too English and short next to her very Italian, four-syllable name.

Most of the boy names I like are English or German, including Marius, Jasper, and Leander. My husband prefers something Italian, like Santino.

If this baby is a girl, we are equally stumped. I have suggested Lorelei, a nod to my German heritage. My husband is not totally opposed, but he doesn’t like that it means temptress. The middle name will be Magdalena, after my grandmother.

We both love traditional names that are somewhat unusual now. The meaning of the name is also important to us. We had a difficult pregnancy, so the fact that Evelina meant “wished for child” made it even more perfect.

So basically, I am afraid I won’t be able to find a name I love as much as my firstborn’s name!

The Name Sage replies:

Read More

Abby Berry Juice profile image

How to Find A Name You BOTH Love

a Name Sage post by: Abby View all Name Sage posts
baby name compromise

Nell writes:

We’re expecting our first child, and we’re keeping the gender a surprise.

We have no idea where to start with names! I like vintage like Ignatius, Posey or Nancy, and my husband is into the more trendy names like Mason or Parker or Ava.

Any suggestions would greatly be appreciated! I’m due in early January.

The Name Sage replies:

Read More


In this perceptive and illuminating guest blog, Zaira Shaal confronts the naming issues facing interfaith parents.

My boyfriend and I have talked about having kids a few times, and the main topic is always what we would name them. He is Muslim, I am Catholic, and while we are both Pakistani, we have very different ideas about the names we like.

We both grew up in North America and now live in London, England so there is added pressure to ensure our children’s names can be pronounced by their friends and colleagues as they grow. Our own names, Waqas (Wuh-kaas) and Zaira (rhymes with Tyra not Sara), have proved difficult for peers to handle over the years so we are sensitive to this.

While he prefers names like Khalil and Omar for boys – and hasn’t really thought about naming a girl – I have always loved names like Audrey and Grace, Adam and Jacob. We came to a compromise and came up with a list of names that work for both religions. This also appeases both sets of parents and ensures our kids all have uniform sounding names. I don’t want one Matthew and one Mohammed.

Read More