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Category: baby name Clara

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We’re happy to announce the birth of our third Nameberry Guide ebook, Best Baby Names for Girls! In it we’ve selected from the over 20,000 girls’ names on Nameberry the 650 choices we think most likely to succeed at containing the perfect choice for your baby daughter. Now we’re going even further. We’ve winnowed that 650 down to a single representative entry plus two runners-up in a dozen popular categories, with a taste of what’s said about each one in the book. Get your copy to see the full list today!

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Nameberry 9 by Abby Sandel, Appellation Mountain

Names like Katniss and Rainbow grab headlines.  Will anyone really name their daughter after the Hunger Games heroine?  Will Holly Madison’s little girl grow up loving her colorful name, or will she legally change it to Rachel when she turns eighteen?

Their opposites are the proven classics.  Dependable names, rich with history, like Katherine and Elizabeth, William and James.

Most of us choose something in between.  It’s the baby naming sweet spot: not as unconventional as Pilot or North, but not as limited as, say, Will and Kate’s shortlist for naming a future king.

This week’s baby name news was all about sweet spot names.  They can’t be dismissed as trendy.  The names would have been familiar one hundred years ago.  Odds are strong that they’ll still be in use in another century or two.

And even though they feature in high profile birth announcements or pop culture references, there’s no reason these names wouldn’t wear perfectly well on a child.

This week’s baby names in the news are:

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Great Redheads with Great Names

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Looking for a name for a red-haired baby? The most common method is to go through the long list of names that mean, well, red-haired, from Rory to Rufus, Flynn to Flanagan. An alternative is to find yourself a worthy titian-tressed namesake, either from the pages of history or a current celeb. So, at the risk of offending by omission such ordinary-named notables as Helen of Troy, Emily Dickinson, Mark Twain, James Joyce, and Margaret Sanger—here are our nominations for best-named redheads of all time. Oh — and where is the most famous redhead of all? Turns out Lucille Ball’s natural hair color was mousey brown.

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Canadian guest blogger and name book writer Shandley McMurray offers some advice on global baby names–picking a name that will travel well. (And those are her beautiful kids in the illustration.)

Growing up with a name like Shandley in Canada wasn’t always easy. I became tired of correcting people’s spelling and pronunciation of it, and, of course, I bemoaned the lack of personalized products like pens and rulers that adorned the desks of my more traditionally-named friends. Then, the world’s increasing reliance on email made things even more difficult, with online editors and others I hadn’t met in person often referring to me as Mr. rather than Ms. in their correspondence.

Now don’t get me wrong—I’ve always loved my name. I’m a loud and opinionated free spirit and a quieter name like Elizabeth or Ashley just wouldn’t have fit. My name set me apart and I took pride in the fact that my parents had invented such a unique name.  So when it came time to name my own children, I thought long and hard about my decision.

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