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Category: baby name Carter

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By Abby Sandel of Appellation Mountain

What’s the 2014 equivalent of the old phrase “Every Tom, Dick, and Harry?”

Every Aiden, Mason, and Jake?

Every Max, Zac, and Jackson?

The most popular names for boys used to hold steady for years.  In 1932, the ten most popular names for boys born in the US were Robert, James, John, William, Richard, Charles, Donald, George, Joseph, and Thomas.  Twenty years later, eight of those ten names were still dominant.  Fast-forward to the 1980s, and 30% of the 1932 boys’ Top Ten still ranked.

As for the girls?  That’s a different picture.  Between 1932 and 1952, seven of the girls’ Top Ten fell.  Shirley and Doris made way for Linda and Susan, and the change has continued at a rapid pace.  None of the 1930s or 1950s girls’ favorites still held a top spot by 2012.

And yet there are more wearable names for boys than ever before.  Plenty of parents are still passing down grandpa Joseph’s name, but the pressure to do so seems to be on the decline.  We live in a more accepting age, where diversity in names feels quite normal.

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By Abby Sandel of Appellation Mountain–The Nameberry 9

It has been another week filled with bold, even brash names for newborn boys.  Girls’ names are no less daring, with inspiration coming from the worlds of opera and automobiles.

None of the boys’ choices would have been recognizable as given names two hundred or even fifty years ago.  The girls’ names have more history, but they still feel fresh and surprising in 2013.

With all of these headline-grabbing given names, does it make it harder or easier to name a child of your own?

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Ever since the first American baby was christened Washington Smith, there has been a tradition here—just as the Brits honor their Royals–to draw inspiration from the surnames of U.S. presidents, with Grant, Tyler, Taylor, Madison, and now Jackson landing high on the hit parade. So here, for President’s Day, are some examples drawn from our history that still resonate—even if the connection to the Commander-in-Chief isn’t always immediately apparent.

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Baby Name Popularity: How local is it?

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We look at the national name statistics and somehow start to  assume that Isabella and Jacob are the top names all across the country.  But then we look at the state stats and see that there very much still are local preferences. 

For example, Carter, which is Number 50 nationally, is in second place in Nebraska and third in Iowa; Wyatt (60) is Number One in Wyoming (Wyoming/Wyatt?), Owen (50) is third in Vermont and fourth in Maine, and for girls, Brooklyn (37) has relocated to Utah, where she’s Number Three.

So our Question of the Week is a two-parter:

Are there any names near the top of the Social Security list that you never hear in your neighborhood/city/state/country? (Please identify where that might be.)

Are there names that seem absolutely epidemic where you live, but are not as popular elsewhere?

Any explanations?

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