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Category: baby name Alexander

posted by: waltzingmorethanmatilda View all posts by this author
international baby names

By Anna Otto, Waltzing More Than Matilda

There’s a lot to be said for having a name that is familiar in many countries. It makes travel and working overseas just that little bit easier, and if you have a particular cultural background, it’s nice to know that relatives in your country of origin will easily be able to spell and pronounce your child’s name. Even if your child never leaves their native shores, we live in a global village, and they will most likely meet, study, and work with people from other countries.

To me, a name with high international recognition needed to be popular in as many regions as possible, so that as a mimimum, it needed to be Top 100 in the English-speaking countries of Australia, New Zealand, England/Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland, Ireland, Canada, and the USA. It also needed to be popular in Western Europe, Eastern Europe, and Scandinavia.

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baby name Jaxon

By Abby Sandel, Appellation Mountain

Not only did we have a bumper crop of high profile birth announcements last week, but the Social Security Administration also released the eagerly anticipated 2013 baby name data.

Oh, the excitement!

Sure, the US isn’t the only country to share statistics – and we’re kind of late to the party, since plenty of countries publish their lists earlier in the year.  But with the sheer number of newborns – just shy of four million – the US data is the mother lode.

Plenty of parents check popularity data when choosing their child’s name.  This week, it’s as if every model, athlete, actor, reality star, and musician seemed to agree: mainstream names are great, but maybe something just outside the Top Ten.

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thomasedward

Which classic boys’ name do you love the best?

Classic boys’ names encompass those that are traditionally popular such as John, William, and Thomas, along with classics fashionable today like Henry and Alexander.

And classic names for boys may also include biblical names such as Jacob and Joshua, along with classics that are newly back in style, from Atticus to Arthur.

But for this Question of the Week, you can only pick one.

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xmasintl

By Linda Rosenkrantz

Though we here in the U.S. have to wait until May for our official 2013 popularity lists to be revealed, some other countries manage to get their reports ready even before the year ends.  As these listings start to trickle in, I thought I’d fill you in on what we’ve received so far.

Scotland

The most complete story to have come in is from Scotland, where the top names are Jack—for the sixth consecutive year–and Sophie, for the ninth. And if you think that Yanks are the only parents into unusual names, Scottish mums and dads chose about 7,400 different first names for their babies, with nearly 4,800 of them unique.

Some of the standouts among girls on the rise: Millie, Poppy, Georgia, Alice, Esme, Mila and Phoebe.  In the blue column, those climbing up include Logan, Lucas, Leo, Kai, Oscar, Brodie, Harrison, Murray, Callan, Hamish, Harvey and Struan.

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posted by: Nook of Names View all posts by this author
ghost5

By K. M. Sheard of NookofNames.com

In keeping with the season, here is an offering of my favorite ghostly names:

Alexander. One of the ghostly children of Lucy M. Boston’s Children of Green Knowe, who lived and died during the reign of King Charles II. The most famous Alexander is, of course, Alexander the Great.

Araminta. Although not actually a ghost, AramintaMintyCane travels in time and appears as a “ghost” to a boy in the eighteenth century, in Helen Cresswell’s children’s novel Moondial.

Banquo. The tragic figure of Shakespeare’s Macbeth, who was murdered by his erstwhile friend. The origin is uncertain, but even the historicity of the man is questioned. It is quite probable he was invented by a sixteenth-century Scottish academic.

Caspar. The perennial “friendly ghost,” first introduced to the world in 1945. Caspar started out as the Dutch form of Jasper, but has long been established in the English-speaking world too.

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