Category: baby name Abigail

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Top Ten Girl Names: Too Popular to use?

a Name Sage post by: Abby View all Name Sage posts

Their favorite name has been in the US Top Ten for years! Should they find something new, or embrace a very popular name?

Sara writes:

My husband and I are expecting our second daughter. We thought we had arrived at the right name, but I keep having second thoughts.

Our older daughter is Dorothy Katherine and our last name is a three-syllable, Czech name, starting with R. It’s a bit of a mouthful. We chose Katherine as her middle name because it was my grandmother’s middle name and my mother’s first name. We love the name Dorothy and she often goes by Dot as a nickname.

For our second little girl, we’d like for her middle name to be Ruth (we each have a grandmother with that name and really like it).

We thought we had landed on Abigail as the first name. I like the name a lot but my concern is that it’s too popular! My name is Sara and I was always the fourth or fifth “Sara” in my class.

I like Abigail because of its traditional, colonial connection. My other favorites are Harriet, Frances, Louisa, Beatrice, and Ida. My husband tends to like more modern names: Lisa, Molly, Maude. We both liked Penelope and Margaret, too. But at this point I feel like we’ve read over the same 20 names a million times!

We are totally stuck and only weeks away. Thanks for your help!

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Father’s Day Names with Meaning

By Linda Rosenkrantz

One subtle way to celebrate Father’s Day is to give a future Daddy’s girl or boy a name with ‘father’ in its meaning, especially if the baby is due around this time of year. These baby names stretch across many cultures, some of them with religious significance and, as you will notice, the majority starting with the letter ‘A’..

Abbaa masculine name derived from the ancient Aramaic meaning “father,” Abba has been in use since the first century. Abba Eban (born Aubrey) was a noted Israeli diplomat and scholar, onetime ambassador to the US and to the UN. The name of the 70s Swedish pop group ABBA is an acronym of the members’ names–Agnetha, Bjorn, Benny and Anni-Frid.

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By Kelly McDonald

March is the month that comes in like a lion and goes out like a lamb, when snow is (finally, hopefully) melting, school vacations begin, and St. Patrick’s Day revelry takes place, and is also noteworthy for being Women’s History Month. Here are a variety of names that would be perfect for a March-born baby, from those borrowed from celebrities to those that celebrate feminism or an Irish heritage.

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A names – those that start with the letter A – have become the most widely used in the U.S., given to over 10 percent of all babies, more than double the proportion of children who were given A names in the 1950s.

You can peg the popularity of A names to pure fashion, and definitely, A names ranging from the classic Abigail and Alexander to the trendy Addison and Aiden have been on the rise for a couple of decades now.  While this may be part of an overall trend toward vowel names, which are up across the board while most consonant-starting names are trending down, A is up the highest.

But there’s evidence that A names may be beneficial for your child in more substantial ways.  A study by researchers at Yale and the University of California-San Diego found that students whose names begin with the letters A and B earn better grade point averages than those whose names start with C or D.  And more law school students named Anna and Andrew tend to go to top-ranked universities like Stanford than those called Chris and Drew.

Even more significant, another study suggests that people with A names live longer – in some cases, as much as a decade longer – than those whose names start with the letter D.   Scary, but compelling if you want to give your child every advantage in life.

A names account for  20 entries on the girls’ Top 100, up from only five (Ann, Anne, Anna, Anita, and Alice) in 1950.  They are, in order of rank with their standing in parentheses, for girls:

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