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Category: adult names

Tell Us About Your Berry Alias!

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Linda and I were talking about our beloved Berries the other day, naturally calling people by their Berry names since for the most part we don’t know their real names, when suddenly dawn broke.

Hey!, we thought.  Here we are, a name site, with lots of regular visitors who are fascinated by names and think and know a lot about the subject, and yet they’re known by names they’ve invented for themselves.  So where did those names come from?

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Quick! Pick a new name

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When I was a kid, I wanted to be named Susie: cute, popular, contemporary — everything the sedate Pamela was not.

Then in college, the name I might have picked for myself was Daisy.  Daisy was the carefree flower child, with long blonde hair and a battered guitar, I would have liked to have been.

Later, in a Jane Austen-reading period, I might have renamed myself the patrician-yet-quirky Eliza.  And now?  Well, while I’m thinking about it, let’s talk about you.

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posted by: Nephele View all posts by this author
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By Nephele

Now that the Social Security Administration has released its annual baby names listings beyond the top 1,000 (including all names that had at least five occurrences in any given year), names researchers can better track the influence of popular culture on our names.

For example, a girl’s name appearing in 2009 for the first time on the SSA lists is “Greidys” – with an astonishing count of 186 baby girls having been given that name in 2009.  Its variants “Greydis” and “Greidy” also appear for the first time on the 2009 list, again in the astonishing numbers of 100 and 25 occurrences respectively.

Another girl’s name appearing in 2009 for the first time on the SSA lists is “Chastelyn” with 150 occurrences.  Its variants “Shastelyn” and “Chastelin” also appear for the first time in 2009, with 34 and 33 occurrences respectively.

While we may expect new names to appear on the SSA lists each year, these new names generally don’t have more than a dozen occurrences, if even that.  Why are the names “Greidys” and “Chastelyn” (with their variants) suddenly so prominent in their first appearance on the SSA list?

Our Latin friends can answer that question easily enough.  These names shot to popularity with those who watch the Spanish television network Univision’s reality TV show called Nuestra Belleza Latina * (which translates into “Our Latin Beauty”).  The winning contestant in the show’s third season (2009) was a Latin beauty from Cuba, named Greidys Gil.  Another popular contestant was Chastelyn Rodriguez from Puerto Rico.  And thus were two new names embraced by American moms (or dads!) in search of baby names.

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Antiquarian Names: Colonial craftsmen names

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For a number of years, when I wasn’t writing about names, I was writing about antiques and collectibles for a syndicated newspaper column.  But of course when I was thinking about antiques, I was still also thinking about names.

Looking at the field of antique furniture, for example, I found that when it came to early British cabinetmakers, the names were relatively unexciting.  George Hepplewhite. Robert Adams. Thomas Chippendale. Thomas Sheraton.  Nothing too juicy there.

But with the Early American cabinetmakers and clockmakers it was quite a different story.  Lots of antiquated Biblical names, more than one Chauncey, Ebenezer and Lemuel, a few virtue names rarely heard in modern times (Prudent, Noble), a couple of Latinate names and a Greek god—in other words a variegated picture of American Colonial and Federal era nomenclature:

Some prime examples:

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Do You Like Your Name?

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Question of the week: How do you feel about your own name?

This is a topic that has been brought up  in the nameberry forums, with opinions ranging from love to how could my parents do this to me?  What we’d like to know now is:

What is it that you like or dislike about your name?  Do you feel that it fits you perfectly or not at all?  Have you ever considered changing it?

Has it affected other people’s impression of you?  Positively or negatively?

Has your feeling about your name changed over time, perhaps as it has become more or less stylish or trendy?

How has your attitude towards your own name affected your approach to naming your own children?  Would you choose something similar in style or popularity or one that’s diametrically different?

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