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Category: Baby Names Popularity



Brilliant Boys: 27 Boy Names We Love

brilliant boy names

By Abby Sandel

Every month, millions of visitors view the names in our database. We love seeing the data on the most-viewed names. It’s the basis of the Nameberry Top 1000, a list that includes many a current favorite in the English-speaking world, but also some surprises that can only be found on the most popular lists at Nameberry – at least for now.

Let’s take a look at some of the brilliant names for boys that are far more popular on Nameberry than they are in the US. In some cases, Britberries might push a favorite from the UK farther up the charts – hello, Callum! But we think it demonstrates that Nameberry readers have a great ear for the up-and-coming baby names.

The names are ranked by the gap in popularity, biggest to slightly-less-big. Looking for the girls’ version of this list? Find it here.

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Sassy Double-Syllable Names for Girls

posted by: Nick View all posts by this author
sassy double-syllables

By Nick Turner

Anyone who watches panda videos online (and what kind of monster doesn’t?) knows that the animals often have names with repeating syllables: Bei Bei, Gao Gao, Lun Lun and so on.

This is a popular naming convention in China, where pandas originate, and it’s undeniably cute. In France, they create diminutive names by adding an “-ette.” Spanish speakers may tack on an “-ita” or “-ito.” But in China, they’ve doubled down on doubling down.

Among U.S. babies, “reduplicated” names like Ling Ling and Tian Tian are uncommon. Still, there’s a fairly strong tradition of repeated-syllable names in English-speaking countries.

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10 Favorite Colonial Names for Today

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Colonial Names

By Kara Cavazos @ The Art of Naming

Since tomorrow is Thanksgiving, let’s take a look at some names that were used in Colonial America and could be still considered fashionable today. Colonial names are chock full of history and laced with virtues and biblical associations.

You probably won’t see many boys named Comfort or girls named Modesty today, and something like The-Peace-of-God or Fight-the-good-fight-of-faith wouldn’t exactly work well for official documents. Which led me to wonder what the most usable, wearable names that were favored in early America might be. I narrowed it down to my top 5 boy names and top 5 girl names that date back to the Colonial Era but can still sound fresh today.

I’ve also added a few middle name combo suggestions.

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The Au-some New Baby Name Trend

baby name Audrey

By Linda Rosenkrantz

Not so long ago, the only names starting with the letters Au that were getting any traction were Audrey and Austin. But lately—have you noticed?—a lot more are now attracting attention. The once male name Aubrey is now in the girls’ Top 20, and then there are the members of the golden Aurelia family, several varieties of August, the word name Aura, the seasonal Autumn, and more.

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By Arika Okrent,

The Social Security website has data on the thousand most popular baby names for boys and girls going back to 1880, when John and Mary came in first. A look at the old lists shows that the most popular names are always changing, but some of the naming trends have been around for longer than it might seem. Here are 11 naming trends of the past.


The current list has some names that carry a grand sense of importance (Messiah, King, Marquis), but the 1880s and 90s also had its grand titles in the 200 to 400 range of ranked popularity. For the boys, there was General, Commodore, Prince, and Major. For the girls there was Queen, which hovered around the 500 mark until the 1950s.


Cities as names are not a new thing, however. Boston was a boy’s name in the 1880s. Dallas and Denver have been around since the 1880s, as has Cleveland (though it peaked in popularity during the presidency of Grover Cleveland, so perhaps should count as a president name instead.) Some of our state names come from women’s names, so it is expected that states like Virginia, Carolina, and Georgia should be represented on name lists. But other state names have made the list too. Missouri made the girl’s name list from 1880 until about 1900 and Indiana, Tennessee, and Texas also showed up a few times as girls’ names in the 1800s.

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