Names Searched Right Now:

Category: Baby Names Popularity

ettboys-jett

By Linda Rosenkrantz

Back in the 1930s and 40s, girls’ names ending in the feminissima French suffix “ette” were the cat’s pajamas. There were glamorous movie stars named Claudette, Paulette and Jeanette, and lots of little girls dubbed Annette and Nanette. But now a funny thing has happened on the way to the nursery: the final ‘e’ has disappeared and suddenly ‘ett’ is one of the hottest endings for boys.

In the recently released list of top names on Nameberry so far this year, there were three two-syllable ‘ett’ boys in the Top 45—Emmett, Everett and Beckett, while also high up on the national list were Bennett, Garrett and Barrett—and if you throw in the single syllable Jett, Rhett and Brett, and sharing the double ‘t’ Wyatt and Elliott, you’ve got the makings of a full soccer team.

Read More

girl baby names

by Ren Williams

Many of the stories about the recent US Popular Names list focus on the names at the top and on the rise: the Sophias and Jacobs, Khaleesis and Jayceons of the baby name world.

But, just as some names go up, others must come down. The following 20 girls’ names fell out of the Top 1000 in 2013, some of them perhaps just taking a nap, others on a long slide toward obsolescence.

Abbie and Abbey

Both of these short forms for Abigail sank even as the original remains in the Top 10. The venerable Abbie has been more popular over the decades than Abigail herself, spending only 35 years outside the Top 1000 since the list’s inception in 1880, compared with Abigail’s 43. Abbey, the younger of the sisters, entered the rankings in 1978 where it remained until this year.

Read More

21stcen-mw

By Matthew Woods, liquidsymbol.com

Some names become popular for a few years, and then fade out of use. Other names remain common for decades at a time. There are names you will find across the U.S., and names that only become popular in part of the country.

It’s difficult to pin down all of the factors parents consider when deciding what to name their baby. There’s the family history, how the name fits with the last name, whether or not the name has already been used by friends and family, and the impact of people we have known with that name. The sound and the meaning both matter. A name is something a person carries with them throughout their life, after all, and its choice is an intimate reflection of who the parents are, and what they want for their child. But despite the personal nature of the naming process, or maybe even because of it, the popularity of a name depends strongly on where and when the child was born.

Read More

popular baby names 2014

By Pamela Redmond Satran

The midyear tally of the most popular baby names of 2014 is in, with Imogen and Asher holding onto the Number 1 spots they claimed for 2013.

Silas, Jasper, and Milo have all risen into the Top 10 for boys, while the sedate Claire is the only new entrant into the girls’ Top 10.

The most steeply-rising names are Cordelia for girls and Archer for boys.

Read More

abby--double

By Abby Sandel, Appellation Mountain

Good things came in twos this week, as the baby name news was dominated by interesting sets of twins, and two new ends-with-R names for boys.

Let’s start with the letter R.

This past spring, the mainstream media picked up on a phenomenon we name nerds have long recognized: two-syllable, ends-with-N names for boys are big.  Whether we’re talking chart toppers like Aiden and Mason, or new inventions like Zennon and Dreyson, N has been the go-to letter for ending boys’ names in recent years.

Read More