Category: Classic Baby Names

No-Frills Girl Names for the New Year

No-frills girl names

By Abby Sandel

January is the month for resolutions. We want to increase our health and simplify our lives. We look at our new calendar and set goals to make 2017 better than the year before.

Is there a baby name style that goes along with all of this January determination?

There just might be. Call them straightforward girl names. Girl names that feel almost timeless, but are enjoying some popularity today. They’re one-syllable, frills-free options that wear well on children and grown women alike.

If you’re expecting a daughter this month, perhaps one of these fresh start names for a girl will appeal.

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Modern Baby Names That Aren’t So Modern

posted by: Elea View all posts by this author
names medieval, not modern

By Eleanor Nickerson, British Baby Names

For many people (especially the non-name obsessed), names tend to fall into categories typically defined by their era.

There are the “classic” perennial choices like Elizabeth, William, Anna, James, which never seem to go out of style; the biblical choices which have been used, in various forms, for millennia (even if their popularity has fluctuated); the “old-fashioned” choices, which encompass anything popular 50+ years ago which have since fallen out of favour; and, of course, “modern” names.

Modern names feel like fresh, new creations. They may be inspired by words (Miley, Nevaeh, Serenity), a newly discovered import (Isla, Mila, Leonardo) or a surname adopted for use as a given name. All feel like they break the mold, treading a new path from the popular given names that have come before and perhaps raising eyebrows among the older generations.

But our perception of “modern” can sometimes be misleading. Here are some names – which appear to be modern coinages – that were used as given names centuries ago, back in the Middle Ages.

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Virtue Names

By Linda Rosenkrantz

As we sit down to our Thanksgiving feasts in this divisive year, it might be a good idea to take another look at the traditional virtues embedded in these names.

In the seventeenth century, for some of the most puritanical of the Puritans, even biblical and saints’ names were not pure enough to bestow on their children, and so they turned instead to words that embodied the Christian virtues.  These ranged from extreme phrases like Sorry-for-sin and Search-the-Scriptures (which, understandably, never came into general use) to simpler virtue names like Silence and Salvation.

The virtue names that have survived in this country were for the most part the unfussy, one-syllable girls’ names with positive meanings, such as Joy, Hope, Grace and Faith.  But then, in the late 1990s, a door was opened to more elaborate examples by the popularity of the TV show Felicity, and its appealing heroine.  Felicity (also the name of an American Girl Colonial doll) reached a high point on the girls’ list in 1999, a year after the show debuted, leading parents to consider others long forgotten relics.

Here are the Nameberry picks of the twelve best virtue names:

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posted by: ClareB View all posts by this author
literary baby names

By Clare Bristow

Halloween is behind us, but now that the days are getting darker and the nights longer, you might still feel in the mood for some ghostly, gothic names. There are plenty to be found in the poems and stories of Edgar Allan Poe.

Poe is best known for his macabre writing, although he also wrote science fiction, detective stories, and many literary essays. A favorite topic of his is some unfortunate man mourning the loss of a beautiful woman – who often returns to haunt him.

You might know The Raven, where the narrator is visited by a sinister bird who is apparently the departed spirit of his fiancé Lenore. (If you can think of that poem without thinking of The Simpsons’ version, you’re doing better than me.)

The Raven just wouldn’t be the same (or rhyme) if it was the spirit of Mary or Joan tapping at the chamber door. A romantic, dramatic name like Lenore perfectly fits the poem’s atmosphere.

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classic girl name

By Sarahbeth Caplin

First day of fourth grade: the teacher takes attendance with strict efficiency. Since my last name begins with C, I am the fifth student called. “Sarah Caplin?” I raise my hand. By the time she gets to the end of the list, it is apparent that Sarah is the female name of choice: there are four Sarahs in our class of a dozen students, which Mrs. F thinks is hilarious. She places us all at the same table: Sarah K, Sarah M, Sarah W, and myself. It was not the first time I had to be differentiated by my last initial, and it wouldn’t be the last.

And dammit, I was already tired of it.

My parents told me, “We just liked the name; we had no idea it was so popular.” It never occurred to them that giving me a name from the Bible with timeless appeal (why else do so many women have it?) and no pronunciation problems in the English-speaking world would be such a burden to me. As an adult introvert, I’m okay blending in, but Childhood Me was the opposite. How could I stand out with a classic baby name shared by so many?

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