Category: Classic Baby Names

girls' baby names

By Linda Rosenkrantz

Many girls’ names come in two forms: a straightforward version ending in e and a more romantic variation with a final a. And these tend to move in and out of fashion as a group, reflecting the tenor of the time.

Right now, we are in a relatively elaborate era, with few parents picking girls’ names like Julie over Julia or Diane over Diana.

But I have a hunch that we’re moving into a more evenly divided time, with the rising of names like Olive and Sophie and Sylvie.

Let’s take a look at some more examples.

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Vintage Girl Names: 9 Fresh Ideas

vintage girl names

By Abby Sandel

Vintage girl names can make great choices for a daughter born today. They’re tied to the past, have plenty of great namesakes, and yet feel fresh and unexpected, too.

The only problem? Many of them are far more popular than you might expect.

Anna Chlumsky, the My Girl child star turned Emmy-nominated Veep cast member, recently welcomed her second daughter. She and husband Shaun So embraced the vintage girl names trend with her name: Clara Elizabeth, a little sister for Penelope Joan.

A former Top Ten favorite, Clara brings to mind The Nutcracker, silent film star Clara Bow, and Red Cross founder Clara Barton. No surprise, then, that the name ranked Number 98 in 2015.

That’s not nearly as common as Emma, Sophia, or Charlotte. But with similarly antique choices like Lucy, Violet, and Eleanor in vogue, it’s likely that Clara is catching on.

What’s a lover of vintage names to do? Look farther down the list, of course! Here are nine vintage girl names that remain quietly under-the-radar – for now.

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Zodiac baby names

If you’re looking for baby names related to the astrological sign of Virgo, here are dozens of intriguing ideas!

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Old Testament girl names

By Linda Rosenkrantz

Have you noticed that even ancient names from the Bible go in and out of style?

These days, Old Testament boy names dominate the popularity list, with Noah, Jacob and Benjamin in the Top 10, as well as Archangel Michael, but with only Abigail on the girl side.

This was not true in the recent past, when names like Sarah, Rachel, Rebecca, Leah and Hannah were high on the list; now Hannah is the sole survivor in the Top 50. There are, however, others showing definite signs of revival, such as Naomi at Number 77, Delilah at 116, Esther at 203, Ruth 293, and Miriam 294, with Deborah and Judith further down, still hindered by their midcentury nicknames of Debby and Judy.

But there are viable girl names in the Old Testament beyond this constricted circle and here are some of the best.

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posted by: ClareB View all posts by this author
Robert Louis Stevenson names

By Claire Bristow

Over a hundred years before Pirates of the Caribbean and Braveheart, Robert Louis Stevenson was entertaining the world with his tales of adventure on the high seas and in the Scottish glens.

We owe Stevenson a lot. In his best-known book, Treasure Island, he gave us the classic elements of a pirate story: the mysterious map, the buried treasure, the pirate with a parrot and a missing leg. He also gave us the concept of a ‘Jekyll and Hyde’ personality, and he was one of the first modern travel writers, recounting his journeys through France and later across America and the Pacific.

Stevenson was something of a name changer himself. Born in Scotland as Robert Lewis Balfour Stevenson, as an adult he dropped Balfour, his mother’s maiden name, and changed the spelling of his middle name to Louis (still pronounced like Lewis).

Friends and family called him Louis, or Lew or Luly for short. When he settled in Samoa in later life, he adopted the Samoan name Tusitala, meaning ‘teller of tales’.

Here’s a treasure trove of names inspired by Stevenson’s tales, from old favourites to stylish unisex surnames.

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