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The Royal Baby Name Update

royal baby name

The due date of the next British royal baby has now been semi-officially announced as April 25, so we are definitely in the home stretch of the name guessing games. Though overwhelming bets are on the baby being a girl, blue names have to be considered as well. Below are the dozen names considered favorites—though there are also some outliers like Frederick, Richard, Alexander and Alexandra lurking on the betting lists.

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Children’s Book Names

posted by: CaraMichelle View all posts by this author
children's book names

By CaraMichelle

Literature has been a source of inspiration for many parents over the years. Thousands of babies have been named after favorite characters, authors, and literary places. This has led to many well-named, book-loving children running around. Chances are that these children will eventually read the book their name was inspired by: for those whose names were inspired by children’s books, that day will come even sooner.

There are hundreds of well-named characters in children’s literature, and many books that have been loved for generations have proper names right in the title. Here are some prime examples.

One prevalent thread in children’s literature is main characters with short, sweet, nicknames ending in the -ie sound. Examples include Elsie (from Elsie Dinsmore), Pippi (from Pippi Longstocking), Winnie (from Winnie the Pooh, of course), Harry (from the Harry Potter series), and Charlie (Charlie and the Chocolate Factory). These names would easily fit right in with currently popular names. Other names in this vein include Betsy (from Betsy-Tacy), Caddie (from Caddie Woodlawn), Julie (from Julie of the Wolves), Nancy (from Fancy Nancy and the Nancy Drew mysteries), and Lilly (Lilly‘s Purple Plastic Purse).

On the other hand, longer names are found in children’s books as well. Everyone knows of Pollyanna, Stellaluna (which was used as Stella Luna by actress Ellen Pompeo), Matilda, and Angelina Ballerina. Similar long names include Coraline (from the book of the same singular name), Esperanza (from Esperanza Rising), and Ramona (from the Ramona books by Beverly Cleary). The boys’ side brings long monikers like Alexander (from Alexander and the Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day), Ferdinand (from The Story of Ferdinand), and Sylvester (from Sylvester and the Magic Pebble).

Children’s literature also brings a bevy of traditional names. Many classic children’s books were written long ago, so this would be expected, but more recent books utilize traditional names as well. Names for girls in this category include Alice (from Alice‘s Adventures in Wonderland), Amelia (from Amelia Bedelia), Charlotte (from Charlotte‘s Web), and Madeline. These names are timeless and will always fit in. Other girl names in this category include Catherine (from Catherine, Called Birdy), Ella (from Ella Enchanted), Olivia (from the Olivia series), Rebecca (from Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm), and Sarah (from Sarah, Plain and Tall). These names are always sure to be pronounced and spelled properly!

Classic names on the boys’ side are all very handsome choices: Edward (from The Miraculous Journey of Edward Toulane), George (from Curious George), James (from James and the Giant Peach), and Peter (from Peter Pan). Any boy would be lucky to receive such a strong name.

Many names from children’s lit are due for a revival. These may not be currently super popular, but they still have rich histories and are wonderful names. Examples for girls are Anne (from Anne of Green Gables), Eloise, Harriet (from Harriet the Spy), Heidi, and Martha (from George and Martha). Girls with these names would have a beautiful and solid first name, and yet would would likely be the only one in their class.

There are a similar number of boy names in this category, possibly still considered fusty and old-fashioned by some, but the right little boy could make them oh-so-handsome. Amos (from A Sick Day for Amos McGee), Hugo (from The Invention of Hugo Cabret), Ivan (from The One and Only Ivan), and Lyle (from Lyle, Lyle Crocodile) would all fit in easily with trendy names. Names in this category that are due for a dusting-off include Clifford (from Clifford the Big Red Dog), Harold (from Harold and the Purple Crayon), Richard (from the Richard Scarry books), and Stuart (from Stuart Little).

Finally, we have names that are more trendy and modern. Our parents or grandparents likely wouldn’t have used these names, but the current “anything goes” mantra of the baby-naming world right now makes them usable. These include Bentley (from Snowflake Bentley), Caspian (from Prince Caspian), and Shiloh (from the Shiloh trilogy). One can also look to last names of characters; if Tom and Huckleberry aren’t your style, Sawyer and Finn might be.

 

 

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Vintage Baby Names

vintage baby names

By Linda Rosenkrantz

I was asked by a magazine interviewer recently why I thought some vintage names come back and others don’t. Why Cora and Flora and not Dora? Why Edward and not Edwin? All of which got me thinking about the influences that do propel names out of the attic and into the spotlight.

The most obvious and evident of these is the celebrity factor in all its manifestations. Stars’ names, stars’ baby names and the names of characters they play:

Some examples:

ScarlettYes, the name of Miss Scarlett was used by a handful of parents following the publication of Gone With the Wind, but it wasn’t until Ms. Johansson burst on the scene that it really took off, bringing it now into the Top 50.

Isla –This old Scottish name was barely heard of or even pronounceable in this country before the emergence of the rising redheaded star Isla Fisher. Now it’s one of the fastest rising girls’ names—it entered the list in 2008 and is now at Number 167, with almost 2000 little American Islas born last year.

SiennaSiena was a picturesque town in Tuscany until English actress Miller publicized the Sienna spelling and was instrumental in advancing her name into the Top 300 in the US, the Top 40 in England and Wales, and Australia.

AvaAnd yes, stars of the past can also continue to exert an influence far beyond their own era. The sultry Ava Gardner was in her prime in the 1950s, yet became a 21st century hit, in the Top 10 for the last decade.

It’s also celebrity parents who have revitalized a whole raft of neglected names of the past, as in:

AgnesJennifer Connelly & Paul Bettany

AliceTina Fey

BirdieBusy Phillips, Maura West

ClaraEwan McGregor

CyrusClaire Danes & Hugh Dancy

Elsie–    James Morrison, Ioan Gruffudd

Ethel—   Lily Allen

HattieTori Spelling

HazelJulia Roberts, Emily Blunt & John Krasinski

Olive—   Isla Fisher & Sacha Baron Cohen, Drew Barrymore

Otis—     Tobey Maguire, Olivia Wilde & Jason Sudeikis

PearlMaya Rudolph, Jack Osbourne

Silas—   Jessica Biel & Justin Timberlake

VioletJennifer Garner & Ben Affleck + several others

WinnieJimmy Fallon

Indelible characters in blockbuster books and movies and TV shows have spawned a large share of the vintage name renaissance, particularly from franchises like Harry Potter and Twilight . Here are just a few:

DexterDexter

Downton AbbeyCora, Edith, Mary, Sybil, Elsie

Frozen—Elsa

Harry PotterArabella, Minerva, Lavender, Luna, Poppy

MatildaMatilda

Sex and the City-Charlotte, Miranda

The Fault in Our Stars—Hazel

To Kill a Mockingbird—Atticus, Scout, Harper

Twilight—Edward, Isabella, Bella, Rosalie, Jasper, Emmett, Esme, Ephraim

And then there are less concrete factors.

The British Influence—Let’s face the fact that our cousins across the pond have been way ahead of us in certain significant trends. The vintage Amelia is their #1 name and Poppy is Number 7. It was the Brits who started the whole vintage nickname revival trend, with Evie, Millie, Rosie, Maisie, Ellie, Elsie, Tilly, Alfie, Archie, Freddie, Charlie, Theo, Frankie, Louie, Ollie, Teddy, Ronnie and Sonny all on their Top 100. As are Mad Men-era names that have yet to make it back big time in the US: Arthur, Harvey, Stanley, Leon—though there are signs that may be coming.

Sight & Sound—Both visual and aural pattern trends can lead to the advancement of some vintage names as well. A couple current ones:

S-ending boysOtis, Atticus, Augustus, Rufus, Linus, Lucas, Silas

Ella girlsBella/Isabella have led to Stella, Arabella, Mirabella, Anabella

Ett boys—Everett, Emmett, Beckett, Bennett

The X-factor—Dexter/Dex, Felix, Axel, Knox, Maximus, Maxine, Beatrix, Xavier

One thing leads to another: Emily to Emma to Ella to Elsa to Elsie

So what could bring back Dora or Edwin? It might just take one cool character or one cute starbaby.

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Ancient Baby Names

posted by: karacavazos View all posts by this author
ancient baby names

By Kara Cavazos, The Art of Naming

Many vintage names are coming back into style today but there are also plenty of old gems out there that very few people are considering. It begs the question, what makes certain names desirable and others not?  Here are ten perfectly viable names with history and beauty that are being virtually ignored for modern babies:

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posted by: waltzingmorethanmatilda View all posts by this author
1940s girls names

By Anna Otto, Waltzing More Than Matilda

The most popular girls names of the 1940s were Margaret, Patricia, Judith, and Helen, but what were the least popular names? Here are ten names which were only chosen once in any year between 1944 and 1949 in South Australia, making them unique for their time and place. They continue to be rare, and some parents will still find them appealing.

Avis
Thought to be a Latinised form of the Germanic name Aveza, most likely a long form or elaboration of the familiar Ava. Introduced to England by the Normans, it was reasonably common in the Middle Ages, and quickly became associated with the Latin word avis, meaning “bird”. Avis Rent a Car was founded in the 1940s by Warren Avis, but did not become big in Australia for some time – it’s now quite difficult to disassociate the name Avis from the rental company, although it’s very much on trend and still seems contemporary and pretty. It was also a good fit in the 1940s, when names such as Avril and Averil were fashionable.

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