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Berry Juice is a collection of the best blogs on baby names, pregnancy, and parenting from around the web, including everything from personal naming stories to the academic study of names, pregnancy information to tips on decorating the nursery.

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Sassy Double-Syllable Names for Girls

posted by: Nick View all posts by this author
sassy double-syllables

By Nick Turner

Anyone who watches panda videos online (and what kind of monster doesn’t?) knows that the animals often have names with repeating syllables: Bei Bei, Gao Gao, Lun Lun and so on.

This is a popular naming convention in China, where pandas originate, and it’s undeniably cute. In France, they create diminutive names by adding an “-ette.” Spanish speakers may tack on an “-ita” or “-ito.” But in China, they’ve doubled down on doubling down.

Among U.S. babies, “reduplicated” names like Ling Ling and Tian Tian are uncommon. Still, there’s a fairly strong tradition of repeated-syllable names in English-speaking countries.

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10 Favorite Colonial Names for Today

posted by: karacavazos View all posts by this author
Colonial Names

By Kara Cavazos @ The Art of Naming

Since tomorrow is Thanksgiving, let’s take a look at some names that were used in Colonial America and could be still considered fashionable today. Colonial names are chock full of history and laced with virtues and biblical associations.

You probably won’t see many boys named Comfort or girls named Modesty today, and something like The-Peace-of-God or Fight-the-good-fight-of-faith wouldn’t exactly work well for official documents. Which led me to wonder what the most usable, wearable names that were favored in early America might be. I narrowed it down to my top 5 boy names and top 5 girl names that date back to the Colonial Era but can still sound fresh today.

I’ve also added a few middle name combo suggestions.

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Brit + Co Berry Juice profile image

12 Thanksgiving Games Kids Will Love

posted by: Brit + Co View all posts by this author
Thanksgiving Games

Thanks to our friends at Brit + Co for sharing.

By Ashley Taylor, Brit + Co

While you’re busy wracking your brain for ways to keep the kiddos occupied on Thanksgiving, don’t just limit your options to puzzles, board games and a bunch of complicated rules. Some of the most fun you can have will only require items you already have around the house. Keep everyone (including the adults) entertained with one of these 12 simple but endlessly entertaining Thanksgiving games.

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By Arika Okrent,

The Social Security website has data on the thousand most popular baby names for boys and girls going back to 1880, when John and Mary came in first. A look at the old lists shows that the most popular names are always changing, but some of the naming trends have been around for longer than it might seem. Here are 11 naming trends of the past.


The current list has some names that carry a grand sense of importance (Messiah, King, Marquis), but the 1880s and 90s also had its grand titles in the 200 to 400 range of ranked popularity. For the boys, there was General, Commodore, Prince, and Major. For the girls there was Queen, which hovered around the 500 mark until the 1950s.


Cities as names are not a new thing, however. Boston was a boy’s name in the 1880s. Dallas and Denver have been around since the 1880s, as has Cleveland (though it peaked in popularity during the presidency of Grover Cleveland, so perhaps should count as a president name instead.) Some of our state names come from women’s names, so it is expected that states like Virginia, Carolina, and Georgia should be represented on name lists. But other state names have made the list too. Missouri made the girl’s name list from 1880 until about 1900 and Indiana, Tennessee, and Texas also showed up a few times as girls’ names in the 1800s.

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karacavazos Berry Juice profile image

Twin Names with Inspired Links

posted by: karacavazos View all posts by this author
Twins not matchy-matchy

By Kara Cavazos @ The Art of Naming

Here in the US, some of the most popular twin sets include names like Matthew & Michael, Daniel & David, Hailey & Hannah or Ella & Emma. Yet others are even matchier such as Lillian and Jillian, Bryan & Ryan or Jesse & Jessica. While there isn’t technically anything wrong with matching names together like this, there are plenty of ways to be more creative when naming twin while still allowing them to have their own identities.

I’ve come up with three ways to help parents make sure their twins won’t have overly matchy names. We will examine twin names that are linked together by meaning while still being different from one another, names that sound very different but still work together stylistically, and names that share a common sound without rhyming or being too sound-alike.

1. Linked by meaning

These names don’t rhyme or sound alike but they do share a similar meaning. This is great for parents who feel the urge to make twin names matchy but don’t want to rhyme or have the names start with the same letter.

Female Twins: 

Aurora & Roxanne (“Dawn“)
Eve & Zoey (“To Live” / Life”)
Corinna & Imogen (“Maiden”)

Male Twins:
Joshua & Isaiah (“God is Salvation”)
Derek & Henry (“Ruler of People / Home Rule“)
Matthew & Theodore (“Gift of God”)

Male/Female Twins:
David & Cara (“Beloved“)
Beau & Calista (“Beautiful”)
Brendan & Sarah (“Prince / Princess“)

Or the rare instance where the meaning of a name is also a name:

Margaret & Pearl (“Pearl“)
Susannah & Lily (“Lily“)
Daphne & Laurel (“Laurel“)
Hannah & Grace (“Grace“)
Ione & Violet (“Violet“)
Erica & Heather (“Heather“)

2. Very different sounds

These names may be of a similar style or origin but they do not sound the same. They do not rhyme; they might not even have any of the same letters in common. These names stand together but have their own identities.

Female Twins:

Charlotte & Matilda
Emma & Chloe
Molly & Jessica
Daisy & Lola
Jade & Tabitha

Male Twins:
Tyler & Brandon
Hunter & Mason
Kevin & Patrick
Oliver & Flynn
Jacob & Gideon

Male/Female Twins:
Cole & Brianna
Gavin & Alexandra
Jeremy & Nicole
Evan & Isabella
Benjamin & Emily

3. Complementary sounds

These names share a similar sound or two, but they are not overwhelmingly similar and they do not rhyme. Often, these sounds will be emphasized differently and the names will have different syllable counts.

Female Twins:

Brooke & Rebecca  (B & R)
Natalie & Lauren (N & L)
Ivy & Genevieve (V)

Male Twins:
Milo & Dominic (M)
Vincent & Oliver (V)
Lewis & Maxwell (W & L)

Male/Female Twins:
James & Tessa (S)
Phillip & Seraphina (Ph)
Brooks & Aubrey (Br)

What do you think of this list?  Whether you like or dislike the idea of making twin names overly matchy, perhaps you can share in the comments some examples of names that you appreciate on twins.  Do you have twins of your own? Do you have twin names picked out just in case? Where do you draw the line between the names being subtly linked and being too close for comfort?

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