Category: Spellings, Sounds and Initials

9 Great Surname Names for Boys

w surname wyeth

By Abby Sandel

Surname names for boys blend the best of traditional and modern. They’re fresh and unexpected, but also familiar and usually easy to spell. Whether they’re found on your family tree or not, there’s a good chance that surname names appear on your boys’ list.

After all, the current US Top 100 is packed with picks like chart-topping Mason, as well as Carter, Carson, Cooper, Logan, Landon, Lincoln, Parker, Jackson, Grayson, Hudson, Tyler, and Sawyer.

If you’re looking for similar names that are still under-the-radar, jump to the end of the alphabet. There are plenty of undiscovered W surname names for boys with all the appeal of current favorites.

These make great substitutes for current Top 1000 names Walker, Weston, and Wilder – or really, for any of the popular last-names-first choices.

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Baby Name Royal

By Emily Cardoza, Nothing Like a Name

Looking through old name data and saying names out loud, you begin to hear the changes in aural trends. Try saying the top ten names from each decade in order, and see what you find! This post is about one sound that’s all-but-vanished from birth certificates: “oy”.

The sound “oy” or “oi” is a diphthong, which means it consists of two adjacent vowels in a single syllable. While the sound shows up quite a lot in English, it’s been decreasing on name records.

Let’s look at some historical “oy” names, then move onto today’s favorites!

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To C or Not to C?

a Name Sage post by: Abby View all Name Sage posts
To C or not to C?

To C or not to C, that is the question! She loves the idea of choosing a C first name to go with their C last name. He’s not sold, but will consider it if they can find the perfect name.

Mintie writes:

In January, my husband and I are expecting our first baby, a sweet little girl! Unfortunately, we’re kind of at an impasse when it comes to names … and time is ticking!

Our last name starts with a hard C sound, and I really want to give our baby a first name that also starts with a C. I grew up with my first and last name starting with the same letter and it was just so much fun. Double initials come with a built-in nickname of Cece (CC), which is adorable.

My husband is not opposed to this idea if we find the perfect one, but he doesn’t want to do it just for the sake of having a C name.

My top names are Clover, Calluna, Colette, Cosette, Cleo, Cecily, and Cerelia. For non-C names, I like Isla, Tuesday, Harper, and Piper.

His list consists of Dawn, Evelyn, Hazel, Alice, Eden, Lucy, Violet, and Juliet.

Her middle name will be Harlow as it is a family name.

Hoping for some help to find the perfect combination that we both love, or some good non-C alternatives!

The Name Sage replies:

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How DO You Pronounce That?

baby name pronunciation

By Abby Sandel

Most baby names come with a fairly predictable pronunciation, at least in English. No one argues over Emma or Mason, and we don’t mangle Charlotte or James.

And yet, other names are open to multiple possibilities. They’re not necessarily wrong – just different. Our assumptions about correct pronunciations are shaped by regional accents and changing trends. Pages and pages in our forum discuss this very issue.

It’s a different challenge from names that are misheard. Name your daughter Emmeline, and she’ll probably be called Emily at least some of the time. But that’s a different kind of frustration than explaining that she’s emmaLINE, rhymes with fine and sign, not emmaLYNN.

Or, of course, the opposite. Because it can be emmaLYNN, rhymes with kin and win, just as easily. Unless, of course, you pronounce it emmaLEEN.

Let’s take a look at nine baby names with pronunciations that often lead to confusion.

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12 Zippy Z Names for Girls

Z names for girls

By Linda Rosenkrantz

There aren’t very many usable names beginning with Z, and even fewer for girls than boys. Yet the very rarity of girls’ names starting with the last letter of the alphabet immediately gives them an element of distinction, as well as an exotic sound.

Over the years, Zelda has been the longest running American Z girl, in the Top 1000 for most of the years between 1880 and 1967 (and returning just last year). But recently it has been Zoe—and all her spelling variations—that has been the massive hit.

Here they are, along with other, less common, great Z possibilities for girls.

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