Names Searched Right Now:

Category: Sibling and Multiple Names

birth announcement

By Linda Rosenkrantz

It’s time for the always gratifying task of gathering up the birth announcements of the month, and September’s harvest did not disappoint, with an abundance of great choices, creative first and middle combos and interesting sibsets.

Outstanding among the girls, there is the floral first name Zinnia and both Darling and Lova (based on a typo for Love) as middles. The boys’ list includes the imposing Ignatius and the hero-name Beckham, as well as distinctive middle names Wellington and Adair. And one girl inherited her dad’s name, while a boy got his father’s name in reverse.

Read More

Sibling Names: The latest from London

British sibling names

by Pamela Redmond Satran

We love combing the birth announcements in the London Telegraph for baby name trends and ideas.

Each time we issue a report, we look for a different focus — unusual names, fascinating middle name combinations — and today it’s sibling names.

While we hate to exclude singletons with such wonderful names as Aurelia Liliana Rosabel and Tiago Rafferty Redfern, the sibling names were even juicier.

Some observations: The newest vintage names being unpacked from mothballs in England are Martha and Herbert.  Some of the most charming combinations mix ethnicities (Emiko and Freddie) or match first letters (Orlando and Ophelia).  Out-of-the-box middle names include word names, place-names, and surnames such as Spark, Houston, and Allgood.

Oh, and, as usual, these British parents manage to find baby names that are distinctive and adventurous and gorgeous without resorting to (almost ever) strange inventions or kree8tiv spellings.

Our picks from the latest announcements:

Read More

posted by: Nook of Names View all posts by this author
royal names

With speculation already swirling around the possible name(s) of the next royal child and with Victoria surfacing once again as a possibility, we were inspired to take a look at what K. M Sheard of Nook of Names had to say about it the first time around.

It is a little ironic that Victoria would now be considered a very traditional and conventional choice for a royal baby.

That wasn’t true when Victoria was named; Victoria — Latin for “victory” — was a rare name in Britain at the time, although it had been in use since the sixteenth century, one of the names plucked from Classical Antiquity. For to the Romans, Victoria was the personification of victory, and worshipped as a Goddess.

Why did Victoria receive such a name? Because that’s what her mother was called. She was Marie Louise Viktoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfield.

It wasn’t actually Queen Victoria’s first name, either. That was Alexandrina, after Tsar Alexander I of Russia.

Read More

Royal Baby Names, Round 2!

royal baby names

By Pamela Redmond Satran

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, aka Will and Kate of Great Britain, have announced that they’re newly expecting baby number two, a sibling for one-year-old Prince George Alexander Louis.

Now that they’ve given their heir an appropriately kingly name, what will they name their spare?

Another name traditionally used in the royal family, we bet, but the door opens a bit wider for a name that may not have been used for a king or queen but has a lesser royal pedigree and is a bit more adventurous.  While we don’t see Diana as a first name, it could well end up in the middle, as could another offbeat choice such as Leopold or Matilda.

Our Top Ten ideas, based on the bookmakers’ odds and our own best guesses.

Read More

august births

By Linda Rosenkrantz

This month, in addition to a by-now-expected goldmine of gorgeously creative individual names, we have two pairs of twins and one set of triplets:

Ivy Juliette and May Vivienne

Nathan Daniel and Edward Harris

Katelyn Elizabeth, Perry Grayson and Johnson Tucker

A preponderance of boys this month, some of them with particularly adventurous names, including Boone, Hawk, Jericho, Johnson and Theron—as well as girls named Channing and Belline.

We also noticed many more consonant-starting names than usual: could be coincidence, could be a trend.

Read More