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Category: Sibling and Multiple Names

Births May 2016

By Linda Rosenkrantz

The latest announcements of berrybaby arrivals were particularly Nameberryesque in their mix of the classic, the contemporary and the creative. Of particular interest:

*One pair of twins—boys handsomely named Hunt Inigo and Nash Zennor

*Two girls named Saskia and two boys called Arthur, indicating a rise in interest for both those names.

*Middle names– including two Wolfs– saluting family tradition, literary and filmic heroes and cross-cultural considerations.

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a Name Sage post by: Abby View all Name Sage posts
following girl name rules

Do too many rules make naming a baby impossible, or is a solid list of must-haves the key to finding a great name for daughter number three?

Kate writes:

We are counting down the days until our fifth child and third daughter arrives at the end of June. We cannot wait to meet her, but I’m growing anxious she will arrive nameless.

Our four older children are sons Damian Joseph and Malachi John, and daughters Clara Sophia and Eve Marian.

My husband and I are picky, and I especially have a lot of naming rules. What do we need to let go of to find something we love?

Meaning – This is more important to me than my husband, though it still matters to him. Our daughters have names that mean precious things to me – Clara Sophia (light and wisdom) and Eve Marian (our mother in nature and our mother in grace). If I love a name and find out it has a negative meaning, it is out!

Originated as a girl’s name – This is my rule only, and eliminates Georgiana, Aurelia, Alexandra, Josephine, Caroline, and the like.

No “or” names – Our two-syllable last name has a strong “or” sound on the second syllable. This rules out Laura, Nora, Eleanor, Aurora, Dorothy, Orla, etc.

Traditional Use – This one is stronger with my husband. I like Solana, Seren, Elodie, Elowen, and Roisin, but he prefers names that are more familiar.

No repeats – We have a large circle of family and friends who are excellent baby namers. Because we see these loved ones often, we can’t use Isabel(la), Genevieve, Evangeline, Lucia, Abigail, Anna, Rose, Sarah, Celine, Gemma, or Miriam.

Popularity – We aren’t extreme about this, but definitely no Top Ten.

We have recently talked about Juniper, but don’t know about a middle, and my husband is unsure. He really likes Elizabeth but I am underwhelmed. We both sort of like Thea, but both want to more than ‘sort of’ like the name.

Any advice is so greatly appreciated!

The Name Sage replies:

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Big Families, Bold Baby Names

big family names

By Abby Sandel

This week, Soleil Moon Frye and Jason Goldberg welcomed baby number four. It’s no surprise that the family chose a bold, unexpected baby name for their new arrival. Older daughters are Poet Sienna Rose and Jagger Joseph Blue, and they’re also parents to son Lyric Sonny Roads. Their new addition is son Story. We’re still waiting to learn his middle names, but here’s betting that it’s another daring combination.

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Newest Baby Name Announcements

April Birth Announcements

By Linda Rosenkrantz

Ah, my favorite time of the month, when we get to see all the wonderful names chosen by Berries IRL. And this past April was certainly no exception!

Two sets of twins this month, all girls:

Felicity Veronica Pearl and Olive Ramona Grace and

Genevieve and Madeleine

Names chosen by more than one Berry: Olive and August

Further evidence of the growing interest in ancient deity names: Juno, Osiris, Mercury, Zeus

Most unusual middle: Wildrose (her sibs’ middles are Nightingale and Mayflower)

Here’s the full list, as reported on the Birth Announcement Forum.

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posted by: sanctanomina View all posts by this author
Baby name dilemma

By Katherine Morna Towne @ sanctanomina

I did a name consultation not too long ago for a couple who had picked out Felicity for a girl, which was a name full of meaning for them, only to discover they were having a boy, and they couldn’t think of any boy names they loved as much as they loved Felicity.

When I posted the dilemma to my blog, one of my readers suggested Felix to them, reasoning, “Since [the mom] was really excited about Felicity’s meaning and saintly pedigree, Felix really seems the perfect alternative to me! Popular in the UK, Spain, and Germany, it definitely has a hip, continental thing about it while not being unusual or hard to pronounce, and the x-ending makes it flow very well into middle names beginning with either a vowel or a consonant!”

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