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Category: Names from the Arts & Pop Culture

word baby names

By Abby Sandel, Appellation Mountain

Every once in a while, two sets of high profile parents use the same name within weeks of each other.  Remember the Camden coincidence from 2011?

Usually it signals a name already on the rise.  That was certainly the case with Camden, a name that cracked the US Top 100 in 2013.

Could Saint be next?

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celebrity baby names

From the silent days when Jackie Coogan was palling up with Charlie Chaplin in The Kid and The Little Rascals were playing their pranks, cute kids have taken up a lot of screen time—some, like Shirley Temple becoming huge superstars—and also, in her case, influencing baby naming.  Here are 14 of the most namesake-worthy examples, from then till now—the ones with the most notable names.

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posted by: Abby View all posts by this author
star grandkids

By Abby Sandel, Appellation Mountain

Susan Sarandon is a grandmother, and Mick Jagger?  He’s already dandling his first great-grandchild on his knee.

Time marches on, and some of those actors and rock stars whose baby name choices made headlines back in the 1970s and 80s are now welcoming another generation of creatively-named children.

Many of the original starbabies have names that were obscure, even surprising, back in the day.  Oliver and Miles, Stella and Liv are all quite stylish in 2014, even if they were unusual three decades or so back.

Will it be the same for the stargrandbabies?  Some of these names seem likely to catch on.

Read on for some of the most interesting – and possibly influential – grandchildren names.

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modern girls names

By Abby Sandel, Appellation Mountain

Is the way we name our daughters changing?

The way we name our sons in 2014 feels different.  For years we relied on Biblical favorites with a few hardy Germanic go-tos mixed in.  But since the 1990s, we’ve seen names like Tyler, Mason, and Jayden reach the US Top Ten.  Jackson is more popular than John, while former favorites like Richard and Steven are less and less common.

Girls’ names have always been more volatile.  And yet, our ideas about what makes an appropriately feminine name were once more set.  Sophia, Isabella and Charlotte might be today’s darlings, but they’re not so different from Amanda, Melissa, and Heather in the 1980s or Barbara, Cynthia, and Karen in the 1950s.

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Literary Namesakes: Last names first

literary baby names

By Jackie, aka CallmeCalliope at namesplash 

Names most familiar as surnames are now prevalent in the Top 100; popular examples include Mason, Parker, Lincoln, and Madison. While the concept certainly isn’t new, surnames as first names are becoming increasingly fashionable, and parents are making more adventurous choices.

While digging through the family tree is one way to find a meaningful surname to use, culturally significant figures could serve as another source for namesakes. Here, I’ve sifted through the surnames names of some of the most famous and beloved writers to find those most wearable as first names. Though several of these names would make very unique choices, they still incorporate the popular sounds found in many other trending surnames. Choosing the surname of a favorite storyteller or poet also provides an opportunity to embed meaning and personal significance into a child’s name.

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