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TulipByAnyName Berry Juice profile image

Fabric Names: Some good material here!

posted by: TulipByAnyName View all posts by this author
fabric baby name

By Meagan at tulipbyanyname.com

Hobbies are a great place to find fresh name inspiration!  My sewing skills may leave a lot to be desired, but I do enjoy watching design shows and that counts as a hobby, right? In the midst of watching a marathon of design shows I found myself exploring fabric names.

Velvet – A name as smooth and elegant as the fabric it represents.  Elizabeth Taylor wore this name well as Velvet Brown in the 1944 film  National Velvet.  Velvet would make a great alternative to the more popular and similar sounding Violet.

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bluejuniper Berry Juice profile image

Six Spooky Doll Names for Halloween

posted by: bluejuniper View all posts by this author
Spooky doll names

By Brooke Cussans, at baby name pondering

With the release of the movie Annabellethis month, it seemed like a good time to look at the names of some of the spookiest real and fictional dolls. They’re a surprising mix of classic names and familiar nicknames, with some very non-scary meanings! So do their spooky namesakes make these names un-usable? You decide.

Annabelle
Think of Annabelle in the same way as Amity – a very pretty, feminine name that just happens to be associated with a scary story made into a horror movie. Annabelle‘ is based on the true story of a doll possessed by an evil spirit who terrorizes her owners until being locked away by paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren. In the movie, Annabelle is a menacing looking blonde doll, however the real Annabelle is actually a Raggedy Ann doll. Annabelle is her real name though, likely chosen because of the type of doll she is.
The origin of the name Annabelle is not clear. It’s possible she is an elaboration of the French name Amabel, meaning ‘lovable’. Or perhaps it is a combination of Anna (meaning ‘grace’) and Belle (meaning ‘beautiful’). Annabelle has been rocketing up the US charts – breaking into the top 1000 in 1995 and reaching #81 in 2013. Let’s see if the movie does anything to stall this.

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greek classical names

By Lauren Apfel

As both a classicist and a lover of names, I find myself in a unique position. On the one hand, I have been exposed, from a relatively young age, to a swathe of wonderful monikers that wouldn’t otherwise be on my radar: Achilles, Antigone, Andromache (to mention a few off the top of my head that all happen to start with A). On the other hand, I have spent many years studying and internalizing the tales of woe that accompany these names. Achilles, for instance, is not just an interesting three-syllable option to me with the benefit of a double letter. He is an angry man, with a delicate ego, who spent a long time sulking in his tent before embarking on a brutal killing spree. Not exactly the connotation I was looking for, you can imagine, when it came to naming my sons.

Okay, to be fair, I was never really tempted to call any of my sons Achilles. But there are some ancient Greek names that make me swoon, names I might even have considered using for my own modern offspring had their backstories not been so utterly problematic. Here are five:

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halloween baby names

Horrors! It’s almost Halloween, which, in addition to everything else, gives us the opportunity to consider some scary names. This year, instead of looking at the usual monstrous character suspects—the ghosts and witches and evil spirits—we’re going to consider the real-life people who created and embodied the monsters, both on paper and on screen. And of course, it’s their distinctive names that get them in our own squeaky door.

Ambrose

Ambrose Gwinnett Bierce was a respected and versatile 19th century author, critic and journalist who wrote dozens of ghost and horror stories, gathered together in an anthology called Can Such Things Be? The all-but-forgotten name Ambrose has a pleasant rosy, ambrosial feel. Popular in Bierce’s time, it’s still well liked on Nameberry, ranking at Number 267.

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Baby Names with Strong Meanings

baby names that mean strong

By Pamela Redmond Satran

Many parents today like the meaning of their child’s name to announce itself: True, Justice, Pax.

Or they might favor a place-name or word name or family name whose meaning is more personal than literal: London as a nod to their honeymoon city or Leonie for its fierce animal reference or Lowell after grandma’s maiden name.

If the ancient meaning of a name has less, well, meaning than it used to, that doesn’t mean it doesn’t matter at all. (Sounds like a tongue twister, doesn’t it?)

In fact, knowing the meaning of the name you choose or even choosing a name for its meaning may be a way to add depth and dimension to your baby name choice. The name you pick may be fashionable or feminine or flow well with your last name, but it also resonates for you (and eventually will for your child) because of the power of its meaning.

Today we’re looking at names that mean strong. That may convey a quality you wish to confer on your baby for the future or even the present. And what child, female or male, strapping or struggling, couldn’t use an extra measure of strength, whether physical or spiritual?

The wide range of baby names that mean strong (or strength or power or powerful) include:

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