Names Searched Right Now:

Category: Middle, Last and Nicknames

posted by: auroradawn View all posts by this author
hidden2

By Aurora Firth aka auroradawn

Like Peter Parker and Clark Kent, everyday names that helped hide their bearers’ secret superhero identities, these nicknames shouldn’t cause anyone to bat an eye. If you want to pick an exotic name that will give your child the option of an “ordinary” nickname—or if you love a common nickname but not the common full name—or if you just enjoy playing with names—here’s a handful of under-the-radar nicknames for some long, bold, strange, or otherwise guilty-pleasure-worthy firsts.

 GIRLS

Addie—Want to honor an Edna in your life? You might consider the more attractive variant Adnisha. Mainstream nn Addie would also work for Ariadne.

AllieThere are plenty of options beyond Allison and Alexandra, but I think my favorite is the windswept Greek Alcyone.

Annie—Formal options for the cheerful Annie abound, from the classics Ann(e) or Anna through the French Antoinette and the Welsh Anwen. Today my favorite is another Greek choice, the mythological Andromeda.

EllieElizabeth and Eleanor are wonderful, but Ellie would also make a great secret-identity nickname if you have a smothered love for the saucy Germanic Elfrida or the alluring Welsh Eluned.

Read More

presidentialblocks1

By Linda Rosenkrantz

On previous Presidents’ Days, we’ve looked at the first and last names of the Chief Executives, their wives and their children’s appellations.  So what’s left?

Their middle names! And in this era of middle-name mania, we think they merit our attention.

Many of the early people in this position did not have middle names, having come to the office before the practice became so prevalent. A significant number bore their mothers’ maiden names; a few others switched the first and middle and so became know by the name listed below.  One—Gerald Ford—changed his name completely.

So, if you don’t like any of the Presidents’ first or second name, here’s an alternative option.

Read More

abby--2-03014

By Abby Sandel, Appellation Mountain

Let’s talk about middle names.

Family names, filler names, fallback names – there are so many approaches to choosing your child’s middle that it can make landing on the perfect first feel almost easy.

Factor in a growing number of children who receive not one, but two middles, and it can become quite the puzzle.

I still regret choosing our son’s second name too quickly, and I remain ridiculously pleased with our daughter’s bonus middle.  (It’s Wren, a nod to my sister’s nickname, Bird.)

There’s nothing wrong with using Elizabeth or JamesPlenty of us have loved ones we wish to honor with a traditional choice.  And a more conventional middle can anchor an out-there given name.

But the opposite is true, too.  Jeremy Renner’s Ava Berlin is far more interesting than say, Ava Grace.

Middles that are meaningful and interesting and maybe downright original have their place, and I’m an unapologetic fan of big, stand-out middles.

This week’s daring middle names in the news are:

Read More

Middle Names: What’s your favorite kind?

middle

Middle names are, in many ways, the place where you can get most adventurous with your choices.

Or are they?

What, in your opinion, is the best kind of middle name to choose?

A creative name that you might love but that you wouldn’t dare put in first place?

A name with important symbolism — the city where your child was conceived, the name of a personal hero?

Or maybe you see the middle name as the ideal place to represent family:  to use the baby’s father’s first name, for instance, or pass down grandma’s maiden name or honor a family member who is recently deceased.

Or the middle name to you might be an opportunity to create flow and melody in a name, and so you look for a middle name with the perfect combination of syllables and sounds.

Read More

lovehatedolls

We got the idea for this Question of the Week from a forum thread titled, Loving Frederick, hating Fred, by a mom who wants to name her son Frederick but really, really, really does not want him to be called Fred or Freddie.

This is an issue that plagues many parents: Loving a name, but not its logical short form.  Or sometimes, it’s the other way around: An affection for Theo or Edie, say, but not so much for Theodore or Edith.

So our question of the week is: What name, is any, inspires this love-hate relationship in you?

Did you choose a name — or do you have a name — whose long form you love and short form you don’t or vice versa, and how do you handle it?  How does that work out for you?  Would you put the short form you love on the birth certificate and sidestep the long form you don’t entirely?

Read More