Category: Middle, Last and Nicknames

The Return of Lemony Snicket

By Linda Rosenkrantz

Lemony Snicket has just made a welcome return appearance, via Netflix, reminding us of what an inventive namer his creator (nee Daniel Handler) is—kind of a cross between C. Dickens and JK Rowling. Personally, I’m crazy about some of the incredible surnames in the series—Baudelaire, Caliban, Poe, Quagmire, and especially the use of the word Denouement as a name.

As for the first names, there are lots of classics, especially for the boys—Albert, Arthur, Charles, Frank and Phil—and some trendy girls’ names as well, such as Olivia and Violet, but there are some more uncommon examples as well. Let’s have a look at names from the whole series.

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By Linda Rosenkrantz

Some interesting names posted in the Birth Announcement forums this month, including our first Loki.

I love the way musical names Allegra, Amadeus and Callas are embedded in a sibset.

Here are all the names:

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9 Great Surname Names for Boys

By Abby Sandel

Surname names for boys blend the best of traditional and modern. They’re fresh and unexpected, but also familiar and usually easy to spell. Whether they’re found on your family tree or not, there’s a good chance that surname names appear on your boys’ list.

After all, the current US Top 100 is packed with picks like chart-topping Mason, as well as Carter, Carson, Cooper, Logan, Landon, Lincoln, Parker, Jackson, Grayson, Hudson, Tyler, and Sawyer.

If you’re looking for similar names that are still under-the-radar, jump to the end of the alphabet. There are plenty of undiscovered W surname names for boys with all the appeal of current favorites.

These make great substitutes for current Top 1000 names Walker, Weston, and Wilder – or really, for any of the popular last-names-first choices.

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How to Choose Your Baby’s Last Name

by Lorelei Vashti

Since medieval times, the majority of couples in the West—including the United States, United Kingdom and Australia—have passed on the father’s last name to the baby. While there have always been exceptions to this rule, it remains a dominant social convention.

But for the last few decades, last name choices have been changing because families are changing.

Many of us grew up with mothers who kept their last name after they married, or in blended families where family members had different last names. We may have changed our last name to a stepfather’s name, or gone back to a mother’s maiden name when we were teenagers. Whichever way you look at it, the idea of the traditional nuclear family is changing. Nevertheless, the practice of passing on the father’s last name has remained.

Many couples are happy to continue the tradition and pass on the father’s last name. But for others, that tradition has become increasingly jarring and uncomfortable. Over the past few decades, many families have been searching for—and finding—alternatives.

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nicknames

by Pamela Redmond Satran

Did you know that Nameberry’s own Popular Names List ranks 2000 baby names of each gender rather than the official US 1000?

That gives you a lot of ideas for unique names that often lie beneath the surface and out of sight. Surveying the baby names in the 1000-2000 group, we noticed that there was a sizeable contingent of nickname-names — short forms that have grown up to become full names standing on their own.

Can you really put Ani or Art, Zelie or Zack on the birth certificate? Of course you can, and it might make more sense to go with the name you actually plan to use rather than taking on a long form you don’t even like. Though of course, you also might want to start with an appealing nickname and work from there toward a long form you find equally attractive.

Here, a contingent of unique and adventurous nickname-names we found swimming beneath Nameberry’s Top 1000.

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