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classic boys' name

By Linda Rosenkrantz

When you think of classic boys’ names, chances are that the first three that pop to mind are John, James and William. Of the three, William is, much like female counterparts Elizabeth, Mary and Margaret, probably the richest in its multiplicity of variations, nicknames, girl versions, etc. Here’s a rundown of the main man and his manifestations.

WilliamFor four hundred years, William was second only to John as the most widely used name in the English-speaking world, and even now is the fifth most prevalent boys’ name in the US, given to almost 17,000 baby boys last year. With Germanic roots, William was introduced to England by William the Conqueror, and has long been a royal name in that country; it has belonged to no fewer than four US presidents and countless notables from Shakespeare to the present popular high-profile prince. 

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heroic baby names

By Abby Sandel, Appellation Mountain

Poor Princess Kate.

Not only is she suffering from serious morning sickness with Baby #2, everyone from late night talk show hosts to gossip columnists worldwide is busy speculating on her due date, whether #2 will be a princess or a prince, and, of course, what they’ll name the newest royal.

Naming any boy – whether he’s coming home to a castle or a condo – can become a battle between tradition and fresh starts.

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posted by: Nook of Names View all posts by this author
royal names

With speculation already swirling around the possible name(s) of the next royal child and with Victoria surfacing once again as a possibility, we were inspired to take a look at what K. M Sheard of Nook of Names had to say about it the first time around.

It is a little ironic that Victoria would now be considered a very traditional and conventional choice for a royal baby.

That wasn’t true when Victoria was named; Victoria — Latin for “victory” — was a rare name in Britain at the time, although it had been in use since the sixteenth century, one of the names plucked from Classical Antiquity. For to the Romans, Victoria was the personification of victory, and worshipped as a Goddess.

Why did Victoria receive such a name? Because that’s what her mother was called. She was Marie Louise Viktoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfield.

It wasn’t actually Queen Victoria’s first name, either. That was Alexandrina, after Tsar Alexander I of Russia.

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august births

By Linda Rosenkrantz

This month, in addition to a by-now-expected goldmine of gorgeously creative individual names, we have two pairs of twins and one set of triplets:

Ivy Juliette and May Vivienne

Nathan Daniel and Edward Harris

Katelyn Elizabeth, Perry Grayson and Johnson Tucker

A preponderance of boys this month, some of them with particularly adventurous names, including Boone, Hawk, Jericho, Johnson and Theron—as well as girls named Channing and Belline.

We also noticed many more consonant-starting names than usual: could be coincidence, could be a trend.

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Double First Names: Mary Ann and Peggy Sue

double names

By Elisabeth Waugaman

The term ‘double names’ refers to the use of two separate first names as one, such as Billie Jean or Mary Jane or Billy Bob .

The practice developed for a variety of reasons. As populations grew, names necessarily became more complex in order to distinguish individuals from each other. Physical descriptions, occupations and locations of specific individuals became last names, as in John by the tower (John Tower), John the short, (John Short), John the Baker (John Baker).

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