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Category: International Baby Names

Short, Simple, Chic Baby Names

chicnames

By Pamela Redmond Satran

When Americans think about chic European names, they tend to imagine the exotic, the elaborate, the intriguingly complicated and foreign.

Yet when Europeans think about chic names, they often these days mean the short and simple and sometimes even the Anglo-Saxon: Tom, Emma, Lou.  Think of them as the baby name equivalents of a perfectly-cut bob or little black dress, elegant and always in style.

Short, simple names that are chic and popular in France, the Netherlands, and indeed throughout Europe include:

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by Chetana Sagiraju of  MomJunction.com

One of the first big events in your baby’s life, once you have brought the little one home, is a naming ceremony. Most Indian families still follow this traditional custom, where the newborn baby is named on an auspicious day. While certain names are very popular and are used over and over again, there are many unique ones too, which sound more different and interesting.

Here is a list of Indian names that haven’t lost their charm or popularity, putting them squarely in the category of evergreen Indian names.

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freya

Mythological names from a range of cultures are one of the hottest and most surprising baby name trends of recent years.

From Freya (that’s her in the picture) to Finn, Juno to Orion, ancient god and goddess names have begun populating modern nurseries and playgrounds.

What do you think of this style in general?  Do the personas and powers of the mythological figure factor into your liking of the names?  And what’s your favorite mythological name or names?

To jog your memory, here are our lists of Mythological Baby Names for Girls and  Mythological Names for Boys, along with a separate somewhat different list of Goddess Baby Names.

Which do you like the best?

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Unusual British Baby Names

British baby names

The British are known as much for their eccentricity as for their conventionality, two stereotypes evidenced in the names from the recent birth announcements in the London Telegraph.

Yes, there are plenty of boys named the traditional Henry and Oliver and lots of girls called the Number 1 Amelia and the very proper Charlotte.

Sometimes, the two images cross, with the same eccentric (to American ears, at least) names being used so often they begin to feel conventional.  The first three months of 2014, for instance, seem to be rife with girls named Matilda and Ottilie and boys named every variation of Fred: Frederick and Wilfred and Alfred and Freddie.

But what we’re focusing on today are the truly eccentric names, the one-offs and the unusual choices that may prove fashion forward or may just be evidence of the infamous British wackiness.  These eccentric new names fall into several different camps.

The first and largest might be thought of as the mainstream eccentric British names, such as:

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ettex

by Jeanette Soto

The name Jeanette was given to me by my young, hip parents during the infamous Chicago heat wave of 1987. The name had been out of fashion for over four decades and not coming back in style any time soon. The minute I learned how to spell it, I was frustrated by all the other people who couldn’t. One girl in grammar school insisted that it should be spelled with a ‘G’ because it sounded “too hard” to be spelled with a ‘J. Most often, people spell my name with one too many N’s or one to few T’s; misspellings include Jeannette, Janet, Jennet, Jenette, Jenet, Ginette and Ginet, but practically nobody gets it right.

Why did my parents give me a name that wasn’t just dated, but came with a slew of spellings? My mother’s excuse: Pregnancy amnesia, or brain fog caused by pregnancy hormones. It came over my mother at the time she was trying to remember the name she wanted to give me, so Colette Madeleine morphed into Jeanette Ashley.

What other names have Jeanette’s retro -ette ending and unusual style? Here, some choices:

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