Names Searched Right Now:

Category: Historic Names

Archives

Categories

12 Amazing Saints’ Names

saints baby names

Not so long ago, Catholic families were all but required to give their children saints’ names – yet another reason why Mary and John were long-time Number 1 choices in the US. While that rule no longer applies, plenty of parents like the idea of sticking to tradition. If you’re among those families, good news – there are more than 10,000 saints, and plenty of them have names that are downright stylish – as well as spiritually significant.

Read More

posted by: waltzingmorethanmatilda View all posts by this author
1940s girls names

By Anna Otto, Waltzing More Than Matilda

The most popular girls names of the 1940s were Margaret, Patricia, Judith, and Helen, but what were the least popular names? Here are ten names which were only chosen once in any year between 1944 and 1949 in South Australia, making them unique for their time and place. They continue to be rare, and some parents will still find them appealing.

Avis
Thought to be a Latinised form of the Germanic name Aveza, most likely a long form or elaboration of the familiar Ava. Introduced to England by the Normans, it was reasonably common in the Middle Ages, and quickly became associated with the Latin word avis, meaning “bird”. Avis Rent a Car was founded in the 1940s by Warren Avis, but did not become big in Australia for some time – it’s now quite difficult to disassociate the name Avis from the rental company, although it’s very much on trend and still seems contemporary and pretty. It was also a good fit in the 1940s, when names such as Avril and Averil were fashionable.

Read More

The Royal Baby Name: All bets are on

royal baby name

By Linda Rosenkrantz

Now that Catherine, the Duchess of Cambridge, is officially on maternity leave, it seems like a good moment for an update on the current royal baby name expectations and prognostications. And just think– although royal babies are almost always given previously used royal names, William and Kate might find they have a little more wiggle room with this second child. But probably not.

The wishful thinking-general feeling among Britishers seems to be that it will be a little princess this time rather than a spare prince. This sentiment was helped along by the occasion at which Kate seemed to catch herself just as she was starting to say a word following ‘my’ with the letter ‘d’ in reference to the forthcoming babe.

Read More

Knightly Names of Camelot

Camelot names

By Linda Rosenkrantz

The legends of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table represent the essence of chivalry and romantic love. And the names in those tales conjure up images of knights in shining armor, ethereal medieval ladies, the court of Camelot and the heroic quest for the Holy Grail.

These legends have existed for over a thousand years, interpreted by countless writers and poets, including Geoffrey of Monmouth, Crétien de Troyes, Sir Thomas Malory, and Alfred Lord Tennyson and have persisted through such modern interpretations as T. H. White’s The Once and Future King, the basis of the stage musical Camelot, countless films, including the spoof Monty Python and the Holy Grail, and numerous TV shows.

Read More

posted by: waltzingmorethanmatilda View all posts by this author
royal princess possibilities

By Anna Otto, Waltzing More than Matilda

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are expecting their second child in April, and rumour has it that they are going to have a princess, rather than a prince (rumour also said that Prince George was going to be a girl, so don’t get too attached to the notion).

However, suppose Prince George did have a sister rather than a brother, what might her name be? I looked through the names of all those born in the House of Windsor to a monarch, or to an heir to the throne, and found that the names chosen for them tended to follow fairly clear patterns.

Read More