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Category: Guest Bloggers

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Nameberry went to the Women 2.0 conference looking for business ideas and found something even more meaningful: A charitable partner that shares our homegrown origins and mission to help expectant and new parents.  Samahope is an organization that crowd-funds individual doctors who provide medical services for people in need, many of them women and children, around the world.  We’ll be doing lots over the coming months to support Samahope; find out more about their amazing doctors and how you can contribute to their inspirational work here.

Samahope cofounder Shivani Garg Patel, pictured here, is expecting a baby of her own.  Here, she shares the story of launching her organization at the same time as she’s launching her family.

Creating a human being and creating a social venture have a lot in common: Unexpected challenges, incremental growth, and the immense satisfaction of making something out of thin air. Not only do both endeavors involve a tremendous amount of change, but it’s the kind of change that makes you realize your life will always be different from the way it was before.

I launched Samahope, which funds doctors who provide medical treatments for women and children in need around the world, because I wanted to do something deeply meaningful to me. Growing up, I traveled to India to visit my extended family and became keenly aware of the economic disparity that exists there. In college, I led a student-run non-profit that provided free medical, social, and legal services to homeless and low-income individuals in the Bay Area. After initially working at Microsoft as a product manager and then McKinsey as a strategy consultant, I was also lucky to work with social impact organizations like the World Bank, World Health Organization and Grameen Foundation. These experiences instilled in me a desire to use my skills to change the world, so in business school I investigated how technology could help alleviate poverty.

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By Abby Sandel, Appellation Mountain

Some weeks, the baby names in the news are aggressively modern.  Rocket and Rebel, Ryder and Stryker.  Girls can be James.  While boys can’t be Sue, there’s no guessing if Kayden, Peyton, and Riley are boys or girls.

Factor in names borrowed from nature, colors, virtues, meanings, and the map, and it can feel like every parent-to-be is considering names that would be right at home in The Hunger Games.  Welcome to the world, Ocean, Indigo, and Haven.  May the odds be ever in your favor.

All of that novelty can make classic, even conservative names seem refreshing.

Little ladies and gentlemen dominated this week’s headlines.  They’re names with history and roots, vintage revivals that are back in 2014, or will be back by 2024.  Or 2054.  And they’ll always come back – eventually – because they’re just that enduring.

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By Abby Sandel, Appellation Mountain

Take a few minutes and try to list all the girls you know named Sophia – or Sophie or Sofia.  How about Isabella?  Zoe, Ava, Madison?

Now list the names that are one of one.

I only know a single girl called Ida, and just one named Arcadia.  My son built sand castles with a little Maxine on a long-ago beach vacation, and I’ve never forgotten her name.  Cordelia and Monica, Zinnia and Murielle, Helen and Claudia – they all stand out, associated with just a single child.

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By Abby Sandel, Appellation Mountain

Thank you, Zanna Roberts!

Just when it seemed like no one was having babies this week, the fashion stylist welcomed twin daughters.  You might have caught Zanna talking fashion as a correspondent on The Today Show, or as a judge on Project Runway.  She’s also senior fashion editor at Marie Claire, so no surprise that she and her husband, Milk Studios founder Mazdak Rassi, have chosen stunningly stylish names for their girls.

But the new arrivals’ names aren’t just stylish – they’re downright quirky.

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The Many Faces of Kate

girl name Kate

The strong, straightforward Kate (along with her variations) is the most popular nickname for the perennial classic Katherine today, often standing on its own. Some of the world’s most famous women bear the name Kate, which is popular in the US, England, and Ireland. The nickname even has Shakespearean antecedents, in The Taming of the Shrew – “You lie, in faith; for you are call’d plain Kate, And bonny Kate and sometimes Kate the curst.” How do you get Kate from Katherine, a Greek name meaning pure? One theory is that it’s derived from Hecate, the goddess of magic. The name Kate, ranked in the U.S. Top 200, seems to work magic of its own. Take a look at some of the most famous Kates.

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