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Category: Family Names

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By Linda Rosenkrantz

The month of March has brought a real bonanza of beauteous Berrybaby names—including two sets of twins, some gorgeous sibsets, and several highly creative middles.  And we’re lucky enough to be able to share the stories behind many of the choices. (Remember: these were babies announced on the Forums in March, even if they were born earlier.) Congrats to everyone!

There was one set of girl twins and one of boys:

Florence Abigail and Georgiana Kathleen, sisters of Oswald John

Keegan Nathaniel and Sebastian Miller, brothers of Weston Christopher

Only two names were used more than once: the boy classics Jack and Peter

The first-initial E definitely seems to be pulling ahead of the long-running A, for both girls and boys

Interesting gender-bender of the month: Gable Juliette

Most distinctive first—Escher; most unusual middle: Tesla

And here’s the full list: 

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Are you lucky enough to know the names of your great-grandparents?

I know most of them: Garrett and Elizabeth/Lizzie, Patrick and Catherine, William and Margaret, and something and Eugenia.

They were born in Ireland and Austria and Scotland and  right here in the U.S.A., and their names make a combination of classic standards and intriguing vintage names.  Plus at least one great-grandmother had an intriguing maiden name that might work as a middle: Early.  Love it.

What were your great-grandparents’ names?  Do you know anything about their names or the lives of those more distant ancestors?  Where did they come from and what did they do?  Would you name a child after them?

Here, some notable names of famous people’s fathers.

Augustine Washington

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George Washington’s father was a Virginia Colony-born tobacco planter. Augustine, the influential saint’s name, snuck back onto the 2012 Top 1000 list at Number 999, after being in limbo for decades, perhaps slip-sliding in the wake of the growing popularity of August.

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febbabyberry

By Linda Rosenkrantz

February may be a short month, with somewhat fewer names than usual, but we’ve still had a full complement of beautifully-named Babyberries reported on the Birth Announcement forum.

We’re always particularly on the lookout for twins, and this month there were two sets, one boy-girl and one boy-boy:

Vera Maeve and Fletcher Joseph

Arthur Noel and Louis Edward.

 It was a month that brought girls named Brynn and Wynne, a Margo and a Marguerite, the return of Enid and Ezeriah, and in middle place Mahogany, Job and Jerome. ‘E’ was the most prominent vowel starter and ‘M’ the standout consonant.

Here are the names, with their sibs, and some explanatory comments.

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Celebrity Names: The Mc’s and the Macs

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Most cultures have some word for names meaning ‘son of’—called patronymics– from the English son, the Danish sen , Armenian ian, and the Scottish and Irish, Mac and Mc. The latter two have made their way into first as well as surname use—as in Macauley Culkin, Mackenzie Phillips, McGeorge Bundy, and McCoy Tyner.These days, daughters as well as sons are given Celtic patronymics: Mackenzie (jump-started for girls by 80’s TV star Phillips, and used for her daughter by Harry Potter author J. K Rowling) now ranks at Number 71. Variant McKenzie is at 152, McKenna at 226, McKinley at 457, and the hybrid, non-Celtic McKayla at Number 701.Right now there are a number of Mc and Mac celebs on the scene, whose surnames could possibly be the next baby names. Well, maybe not McConaughey.

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By Linda Rosenkrantz

On previous Presidents’ Days, we’ve looked at the first and last names of the Chief Executives, their wives and their children’s appellations.  So what’s left?

Their middle names! And in this era of middle-name mania, we think they merit our attention.

Many of the early people in this position did not have middle names, having come to the office before the practice became so prevalent. A significant number bore their mothers’ maiden names; a few others switched the first and middle and so became know by the name listed below.  One—Gerald Ford—changed his name completely.

So, if you don’t like any of the Presidents’ first or second name, here’s an alternative option.

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