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Category: Baby Names




By Abby Sandel

Kristin Cavallari and Jay Cutler recently welcomed baby number three, and it’s a girl! Saylor James joins big brothers Camden Jack and Jaxon Wyatt.

No sooner had Cavallari shared her happy news than Bristol Palin took to Instagram to declare that she, too, has chosen for her daughter, due in December. Only Palin will spell it Sailor.

Sailor was also the name Liv Tyler chose for her son earlier this year. And, of course, way back in 1998, Christie Brinkley gave the name to a daughter.

Could Sailor and Saylor be the next big thing in baby names?

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posted by: Kara Blakley View all posts by this author
synchronized sisters

By Kara Blakley

Twin names and honor names are some of the hottest topics on the Nameberry forums.

Some folks like a direct approach, sticking with a shared first initial or passing down identical names from one generation to the next. Others like a more subtle approach. For the subtle crowd, I like the idea of ‘cognate’ names: names that are either the direct meaning of a name (e.g., Margaret means pearl), or names that share a meaning. These names can add a subtle connection between siblings or generations, or alternatively, they might be names you want to avoid using in the same combination.

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Brilliant Boys: 27 Boy Names We Love

brilliant boy names

By Abby Sandel

Every month, millions of visitors view the names in our database. We love seeing the data on the most-viewed names. It’s the basis of the Nameberry Top 1000, a list that includes many a current favorite in the English-speaking world, but also some surprises that can only be found on the most popular lists at Nameberry – at least for now.

Let’s take a look at some of the brilliant names for boys that are far more popular on Nameberry than they are in the US. In some cases, Britberries might push a favorite from the UK farther up the charts – hello, Callum! But we think it demonstrates that Nameberry readers have a great ear for the up-and-coming baby names.

The names are ranked by the gap in popularity, biggest to slightly-less-big. Looking for the girls’ version of this list? Find it here.

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Nick Berry Juice profile image

Sassy Double-Syllable Names for Girls

posted by: Nick View all posts by this author
sassy double-syllables

By Nick Turner

Anyone who watches panda videos online (and what kind of monster doesn’t?) knows that the animals often have names with repeating syllables: Bei Bei, Gao Gao, Lun Lun and so on.

This is a popular naming convention in China, where pandas originate, and it’s undeniably cute. In France, they create diminutive names by adding an “-ette.” Spanish speakers may tack on an “-ita” or “-ito.” But in China, they’ve doubled down on doubling down.

Among U.S. babies, “reduplicated” names like Ling Ling and Tian Tian are uncommon. Still, there’s a fairly strong tradition of repeated-syllable names in English-speaking countries.

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karacavazos Berry Juice profile image

10 Favorite Colonial Names for Today

posted by: karacavazos View all posts by this author
Colonial Names

By Kara Cavazos @ The Art of Naming

Since tomorrow is Thanksgiving, let’s take a look at some names that were used in Colonial America and could be still considered fashionable today. Colonial names are chock full of history and laced with virtues and biblical associations.

You probably won’t see many boys named Comfort or girls named Modesty today, and something like The-Peace-of-God or Fight-the-good-fight-of-faith wouldn’t exactly work well for official documents. Which led me to wonder what the most usable, wearable names that were favored in early America might be. I narrowed it down to my top 5 boy names and top 5 girl names that date back to the Colonial Era but can still sound fresh today.

I’ve also added a few middle name combo suggestions.

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