Gaelic girls

  1. Aibhilin
    • Origin:

      Irish variation of Evelyn
    • Description:

      A spelling variation of Evelyn for those who prefer the Irish form. Little Aibhilins might have to explain how to pronounce their name, but some may feel that it's worth it to choose a unique option.
  2. Aileen
    • Origin:

      Irish variation of Helen
    • Meaning:

      "bright, shining light"
    • Description:

      Irish Aileen and Scottish Eileen may be pronounced the same way or Aileen can be pronounced with a long a at the beginning. While neither is particularly stylish, Aileen is slightly more popular and has reversed its downward slide to inch upward in the past few years, perhaps thanks to its stylish A beginning. Nicknames for Aileen include Isla, Ayla, Lee and Lena.
  3. Ailis
    • Origin:

      Scottish Gaelic
    • Meaning:

      "noble"
    • Description:

      This attractive and unique Scottish form of Alice can also be found in the spelling Aileas. Like Alice, it ultimately derives from the Germanic name Adalheidis. Spelt with the fada, Ailís, it's Irish and pronounced with a longer final vowel: AY-leesh.
  4. Aisling
    • Origin:

      Irish
    • Meaning:

      "dream, vision"
    • Description:

      Aisling is currently a very popular Irish name for girls. Pronounced variously as ASH-ling, ASH-lin or ash-LEEN, it was part of the revival of authentic Irish names in the twentieth century, and is now being sparingly used by U.S. parents in place of the dated Ashley--though often spelled phonetically as Ashlyn or Ashlynn.
  5. Aoibhe
    • Origin:

      Irish
    • Meaning:

      "life, or beauty"
    • Description:

      Aoibhe may be considered a form of either Aoife -- beauty in Irish -- or Eve, which means life. Either way, this popular Irish name for girls is pronounced as Eva though outside of Ireland few would guess that. Leave Aoibhe to the Gaelic speakers.
  6. Aoibheann
    • Origin:

      Irish
    • Meaning:

      "beautiful sheen"
    • Description:

      An ancient Aoibheann was the mother of Saint Enda, and Aoibheann remains popular in Ireland today, sometimes with its Anglicized spelling Eavan.
  7. Aoibhinn
    • Origin:

      Variation of Aoibheann, Irish
    • Meaning:

      "beautiful sheen"
    • Description:

      Aoibhinn and its twin name Aoibheann may be popular in Ireland but most English-speakers would find the spelling baffling and the pronunciation impossible to divine. It's ee-van, or se-vin, fitting with the Irish popularity of many names -- Aoife, Eabha, Ava -- with this similar sound.
  8. Aoife
    • Origin:

      Irish Gaelic
    • Meaning:

      "beautiful, radiant"
    • Description:

      Aoife, pronounced EE-fa, is derived from the Irish word aoibh, meaning "beauty." Aoife was borne by several different heroines of ancient Irish legend. In one tale, she was the fiercest woman warrior in the world and enemy of her twin sister, Scathach.
  9. Bedelia
    • Origin:

      Irish
    • Meaning:

      "strength or exalted one"
    • Description:

      This fanciful Irish extension of Bridget is known here through the wacky Amelia Bedelia books for kids -- an association your child may or may not like.
  10. Bridget
    • Origin:

      Anglicized variation of Gaelic Brighid
    • Meaning:

      "strength or exalted one"
    • Description:

      Bridget is the Anglicized form of Brigid, an Irish-Gaelic name that was derived from the word brígh, which means "strength."
  11. Eabha
    • Origin:

      Irish form of Eve
    • Meaning:

      "life"
    • Description:

      Eabha, along with Aoife and Aoibhe and even the Anglo Ava, are all Eve sisters or soundalikes in the Irish Top 100. Outside of Ireland, though, this Gaelic spelling would prove difficult. Confusingly for English speakers, this name beginning with E is pronounced as Ava, while the A-beginning Aoibhe is like Eva.
  12. Eibhlin
    • Origin:

      Irish
    • Meaning:

      "shining, brilliant"
    • Description:

      Irish Gaelic form of Evelyn or Aveline, more authentically spelled Eibhlín.
  13. Eilidh
    • Origin:

      Gaelic form of Eleanor
    • Description:

      Long popular in Scotland, this attractive name is strictly-speaking the Gaelic version of Eleanor, but is also often considered part of the Helen family of names. After the Normans introduced it into the British Isles, it was transformed into Aileen or Evelyn. It has rarely been heard in the US, but it is slowly starting to be used here too.
  14. Eilis
    • Origin:

      Irish variation of Elizabeth
    • Meaning:

      "pledged to God"
    • Description:

      Familiar in the US thanks to the lovely movie Brooklyn, based on the Colm Toibin novel of the same name. Popular in medieval times, it is still used in Ireland (properly spelt with a fada: Eilís) could make an alternative to the super-popular Isla. Eilish and Eibhlis are alternate forms.
  15. Eilish
    • Origin:

      Anglicized variation of Eilis, Irish form of Hebrew Elizabeth
    • Meaning:

      "pledged to God"
    • Description:

      Eilish is one of those Irish names that, thanks to a celebrity, has suddenly become much more familiar to English speakers. Irish-American singer Billie Eilish (Eilish is actually one of her middle names) introduced the wider world to this Irish name as actress Saoirse Ronan did with hers.
  16. Eimear
    • Origin:

      Irish Gaelic
    • Meaning:

      "swift"
    • Description:

      Sometimes spelled Emer and pronounced "EE-mer," the legendary wife of Cuchulainn possessed the six gifts of womanhood: beauty, voice, speech, wisdom, chastity, and needlework. A fresh alternative to Emma, but the two have the potential to be frequently confused.
  17. Eira
    • Origin:

      Welsh
    • Meaning:

      "snow"
    • Description:

      This Welsh nature name that can be pronounced exactly like the male Ira. Or, to avoid confusion, you could just name her Snow.
  18. Ffion
    • Origin:

      Welsh
    • Meaning:

      "foxglove"
    • Description:

      This unusual (to non-Welsh speakers) is near the top of the charts in Wales, carried by the recent taste for native Welsh names. Those in Wales say it's already on the way down, but for outsiders wanting to honor their Welsh heritage, it still makes an intriguing choice.
  19. Isobel
    • Origin:

      Scottish variation of Isabel
    • Meaning:

      "pledged to God"
    • Description:

      The Scottish spelling of Isabel has a definite character of her own, the 'o' giving her an extra infusion of strength but also an element of confusion. How do you pronounce that? Answer: Exactly like Isabel or Isabelle.
  20. Kaitlin
    • Origin:

      Spelling variation of Caitlin
    • Description:

      Kaitlin is a variation of Caitlin that's on a steep decline; it dropped out of the Top 1000 in 2013, after more than three decades on the list.