Category: Welsh baby names

By Linda Rosenkrantz

Now it’s the boy’s turn to romance their names.

We recently posted a list of 100 girls’ names in translation, where we took some rather prosaic appellations like Helen, Henrietta and Hedwig, and gave them some international flair via their translations into other languages. Well, several of you asked us to do the same for the boys, and so here they are. Of course there are countless other versions and variations—maybe you’ll find the honor replacement you’ve been looking for!

Ralph and Roland, meet Raoul and Orlando.

Read More

posted by: ClareB View all posts by this author

By Clare Bristow

Welsh names can be divisive. Some people love them for their look, sound and cultural associations, while others run screaming from the unfamiliar spelling and pronunciation.

In this post we’ll look at some of the oldest Welsh literary names, and I hope you’ll find them surprisingly usable.

Read More

10 Boys’ Names We Should Steal

European baby boy names

by Pamela Redmond Satran

In this global culture, many of the same boys’ names are popular in both Europe and the US: Noah, Jacob, and William, for instance. But there are other names that seem to flourish there while going largely ignored here. Not every European name can make it in America, but here are ten we consider ripe for appropriation:

Read More

By Sarah Linke Mezzini

In tribute to the much respected, admired and missed ‘Rowangreeneyes,’ her friend and fellow Berry offers this summing up of Blaire Emerson‘s fascination with and unique taste in names.

Blaire Irwin Emerson, better known here as Rowangreeneyes, joined Nameberry not long after the birth of her daughter, Rowan Jane, in 2011. As a self-confessed name nerd, she was keen on finding names for her future second child. She loved many different types of names, particularly boys’ names on girls, which she became famous for within the Nameberry community. Her other loves included international names (particularly Welsh), nature names, Southern names and word names. At the time of her passing, she was 35 weeks pregnant with her second child. In remembrance of Blaire, here are some of her favourites.

Read More

posted by: Elea View all posts by this author

By Eleanor Nickerson, British Baby Names

What names are quintessentially ‘British’?

I see this question a lot but it’s a hard one to pin down. Do we mean solely British in origin, or only British in use? When Prince George was born our media heralded it as a “quintessentially British” name — and why not? We’ve had numerous kings bear the name, and it’s even the name of the patron saint of England. But George was originally a Greek name, brought late into our Royalty by German Hanovarians. Ask many Americans and the first George they think of is Washington or Bush.

For me, the quintessentially British names are those which are very familiar to us as a nation, that have been or are currently popular, but are little used in America, Canada, Australia and other English-speaking countries. Names such as Nicola – our darling of the 70s – Darcy, Imogen, Poppy, Freya, Alfie, Jenson, Gareth, Alistair and Finlay.

Read More