Category: vintage nicknames

By Linda Rosenkrantz

Like our cousins across the pond, we’ve fallen in love with vintage nicknames for our girls—names like Maisie and Mabel and Sadie and Josie and Hattie are already on the rise. But do those parents who want a little Hattie necessarily consider putting Harriet or Henrietta on the birth certificate?

Maybe, maybe not.

In some cases, the adorable short form is actually succeeding in waking up its sleeping mother name. Like Josephine, for instance, and Beatrice. But here are some others whose full versions have not seen as much—if any– action, as adorable as their period nicknames may be.

Which of these cute, often tomboyish, girl nicknames do you think are capable of reviving their more staid Great-Grandma names?

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By Linda Rosenkrantz

For a while there it looked like nickname names were on their way out. Baby William was called William and not Billy or Willie and James was James, not Jimmy or Jim.

That part still holds true to a great extent, but suddenly there’s a whole raft of fresh-sounding nicknames, many of them vintage ones making a return (and strangely enough, some of the oldest are the most appealing); and a number of them are popular enough to be used on there own.

Here are some of the hottest new nicknames right now, mostly with the older pet forms they’ve replaced:

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By Eleanor Nickerson of British Baby Names

Brits love diminutives. We use them, often automatically, to shorten names in a familiar way, and they have been essential for centuries as a way of distinguishing individuals with the same name. We love them so much, many of them have now been elevated into full-name status, and happily litter the Top 100.

The most common are two-syllable, ie/y-endings we know and love well; Isabelles are Izzy, Olivers are Ollie, Katherines are Katies and Fredericks are Freddies.  But more and more, parents are looking to a more brisk and quirky style of diminutive. Edwards are often Ned, rather than Eddy; several Henrys are Hal, and Christophers are the striking Kit rather than Chris.

With this niche trend in mind, here is a rundown of some one-syllable diminutives that have become overlooked since they were developed in the Middle Ages. Several of them, perhaps surprisingly, were unisex.

Bess

In the 16th century Bess was a popular nickname for Elizabeth. You could almost say that it was the diminutive for the name, as the most famous bearer, Elizabeth I, was known fondly as “Good Queen Bess“. It began to lose favour in the 18th century, but was revived as Bessie in the 19th. In some instances, Bess was also used as a diminutive for Beatrice.

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Comeback Kid Nicknames for Boys

vintage boys' names

By Linda Rosenkrantz

Here is Part 2 of our search for fresh vintage nickname names, and this time we’re looking at boys’ names that at one time registered on the Top 1000 list.

Bear in mind, though, that, because of the growth of the overall population we can sometimes be dealing with a vastly different number set between then and now. For example, when Ned peaked in 1907 at Number 291, that figure represented a mere 54 boys, whereas Number 291 in 2014 (Hector) was given to 1,209 boys.

Some of these names have long been completely off the radar, while others will be somewhat more familiar.

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Cute Comeback-Kid Nicknames for Girls

By Linda Rosenkrantz

After a brief hiatus following the SandyMandyCindyMindy years, nickname names are making a strong comeback. Just recently we’ve seen starbabies with names like Andy (for a girl), Art, Cy, Gus, Josh and Sid on their birth certificates. So with this in mind, we’re embarking here on a 4-part-long search for fresh vintage nickname ideas.

Today we consider girl nicknames that were used frequently enough at one time to make it into the Top 1000 list. Some dropped off because their mother names were no longer current (Effie/Euphemia), some just because they’d come to sound too grandmotherly, and others, like Freddie, that had become strictly male.

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