Category: vintage names for girls

Unusual Vintage Names for Girls

unusual vintage names for girls

by Pamela Redmond

We’ve been digging around in the baby name lists from the 1880s (around here, that’s called fun) and we’ve come up with dozens of rare and surprising names for girls.

These vintage names for girls go way beyond traditional choices like Mary and Jane that we think of as 19th century names. Many of these names are all-but-unknown today, while others are familiar yet unusual.

If you are looking for an unusual name for your baby girl that feels new and deeply-rooted at the same time, consider the names here.

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Vintage Girls’ Names and Nicknames

vintage girls' names

by Pamela Redmond

Vintage baby names have been back for a while now, but some vintage names are still waiting quietly for their new turn in the spotlight.

These pairs of vintage girls’ names and their old school nicknames are drawn from the list of popular baby names in 1880, the first year the US kept baby name records.

Nickname-names, usually ending in -ie for girls, were often used all by themselves, with Minnie, Annie, and Nellie all in the Top 20.

But there were also lots of companion names, proper laced-up girls’ names with adorable nickname options. In the list that follows, sometimes it’s the proper name that’s more unusual — Adelia is way more distinctive than Addie, for example — and sometimes it’s the nickname, as in Mellie as a short form of Amelia or Jettie for Juliet. And sometimes — Araminta and Mintie, for instance — it’s both.

Whatever your choice, this is a perfect way to get two names in one: formal and playful, vintage and fresh, unusual and familiar.

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posted by: Tiana Putric View all posts by this author

By Tiana Putric

Girly appellations ending in the vowels ‘ie’ hold an endless appeal, perhaps it’s due to their innocent femininity. Think of today’s chart-rankers –– Annie, Dixie, Ellie, Elsie, Evie, Gracie, Hallie, Hattie, Jamie, Josie, Katie, Kenzie, Lexie, Lillie, Macie, Maggie, Maisie, Millie, Rosie, Sadie, Sophie, and Zoie. And yet, as appealing as these contemporary favorites are, there is a long list of lost vintage ‘ie’-ending names for girls that could be ready for a renaissance.

Here are five such vintage charmers –– from Acie to Kizzie to Mossie –– along with a long list of others –– that are not only fitting for a middle spot or a nickname but are also on par with some of today’s most popular ‘ie’ ending firsts.

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Vintage Girl Names: 9 Fresh Ideas

By Abby Sandel

Vintage girl names can make great choices for a daughter born today. They’re tied to the past, have plenty of great namesakes, and yet feel fresh and unexpected, too.

The only problem? Many of them are far more popular than you might expect.

Anna Chlumsky, the My Girl child star turned Emmy-nominated Veep cast member, recently welcomed her second daughter. She and husband Shaun So embraced the vintage girl names trend with her name: Clara Elizabeth, a little sister for Penelope Joan.

A former Top Ten favorite, Clara brings to mind The Nutcracker, silent film star Clara Bow, and Red Cross founder Clara Barton. No surprise, then, that the name ranked Number 98 in 2015.

That’s not nearly as common as Emma, Sophia, or Charlotte. But with similarly antique choices like Lucy, Violet, and Eleanor in vogue, it’s likely that Clara is catching on.

What’s a lover of vintage names to do? Look farther down the list, of course! Here are nine vintage girl names that remain quietly under-the-radar – for now.

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Vintage Baby Names: Gone girls of 1916

Sometimes it feels as though our attics have been completely cleared out of stored vintage baby names. But every time we go back up there we do manage to succeed in finding a number of past treasures that haven’t been dusted off yet. The names shown here were all in the Top 1000 in 1916, one hundred years ago, several in the top half of the list and many of them not seen again for fifty years. Let’s see if the Hundred Year Rule applies and they’re ready for a comeback.

By Linda Rosenkrantz

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