Category: vintage baby names

a Name Sage post by: Abby View all Name Sage posts

 She says vintage; her partner prefers something more mainstream. Where’s the sweet spot?

Emma writes:

My partner and I are expecting our first together in less than two months! My partner has two daughters already; Olivia Sadie and Lucy Elena and I’ve got another Penelope Tilda. We’re team green, but I have a feeling it’s a girl (which probably means it’s a boy!)

For a boy, we are pretty sure on Hugo. The Hu- part is the first two letters of my MIL‘s maiden name (Hunter), and the -go are the first two letters of my mum’s maiden name (Gordon).

We’re having a lot more trouble with girl’s names. DP’s top name is Ava, which seems too popular. Her second top name is Evelyn, but it’s my goddaughter’s name, and I feel it’s too close for comfort.

My top name is Martha. DP hates it. My second choice would be Dorothy. DP finds it too vintage, and can’t get away from the Wizard of Oz association.

We do both love Felicity and Cecily, but our surnames are very ‘s’ heavy. We like, but don’t love Daphne, Elowen, Georgia, Rowena, Juliet, Delilah, Audrey, Eleanora, Vivian, Marina, Cora, and Arabelle.

Could you please give us some suggestions for this baby, if it’s a girl? Or even just tell us we’re being stupid and we’ve already looked over our perfect name!

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44 Names from 1917 You Should Use Now!

By Linda Rosenkrantz

In the baby-name world there’s something called the 100-Year-Rule, the theory that it takes a century for names to be ready to make a comeback. That timeframe has shrunk considerably, with the resurgence of names from the fifties, sixties and even later, that is happening right now.

But every year we do like to look back at the names from a century ago, to dig for Top 500 examples that haven’t made it back to the current Top 1000 (actually two years short since we’re still looking at 2015) , but have the potential to do so. And for good measure, we’ll add the names that are in that same position now.

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An Anglophile’s Guide to Baby Names

british baby names

by Pamela Redmond Satran

Baby names are in general a lot more adventurous in the US than they are in the UK, with American parents using word names and place names and surname-names and gender-ambiguous names in far greater numbers than their British counterparts.

But British parents tend to be broader-minded when it comes to using vintage names with more history than gloss. Some of the names that might be considered dowdy and old-fashioned by Americans – Constance and Hubert, for example – are chic in London.

A recent review of birth announcements produced this list of names favored by contemporary parents in Britain. If you love vintage baby names that are also distinctive, you may find your perfect name here.

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By Linda Rosenkrantz

Like our cousins across the pond, we’ve fallen in love with vintage nicknames for our girls—names like Maisie and Mabel and Sadie and Josie and Hattie are already on the rise. But do those parents who want a little Hattie necessarily consider putting Harriet or Henrietta on the birth certificate?

Maybe, maybe not.

In some cases, the adorable short form is actually succeeding in waking up its sleeping mother name. Like Josephine, for instance, and Beatrice. But here are some others whose full versions have not seen as much—if any– action, as adorable as their period nicknames may be.

Which of these cute, often tomboyish, girl nicknames do you think are capable of reviving their more staid Great-Grandma names?

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a Name Sage post by: Abby View all Name Sage posts

They’ve narrowed down names for Cora‘s brother, but they’re still feeling stuck! Is the best name already on their list, or is it time to start fresh?

Danika writes:

We are stuck! Our son is set to arrive in April, and we’re not in love with any of the names on our short list.

Our daughter’s name, Cora, felt right from the start. We’re not having the same feeling with any of our choices this time around.

I really like to use family names somewhere in the mix, and the meaning of names is important as well. Our daughter’s middle is Brewster, a family surname, and we’re considering Christopher, Cameron, Thornton, or Guy for a middle.

Some names we’ve considered:

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