Category: vintage baby names

New Old Names for the New Year

Looking for fresh inspiration for your 2016 baby? Some of the newest names are the oldest – favorites from a century ago, ready for revival in the coming year. Twenty years ago, Amelia and Oliver were the new old names to watch. Now that they’re near the top of the charts, another set of antique appellations is on the rise. None of these names rank in the US Top 1000 – yet — but they’re all poised to make a comeback in 2016.By Abby Sandel

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By Linda Rosenkrantz & Pamela Redmond Satran

One day you’re out, and the next day — if you’re one of the old-fashioned formerly-dowdy baby names here — you’re very very in.  Just a few years ago, you might have cringed if the family expected you to name the baby after Great-Aunt Martha or Grandpa Harvey.  Today, those names and the others on the list are among the fastest-rising on the Social Security list.  These are the Olives and Oscars, the Sadies and Silases of tomorrow.

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Vintage Name or Nickname?

vintage nicknames for girls

The names collected here are a charming group of vintage choices for girls. The other thing that unites them is that they all originated as short forms and yet can stand on their own. That means you can either use them as nicknames for more formal names or put them proudly on the birth certificate. Let’s consider the options.

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Vintage Baby Names

By Linda Rosenkrantz

I was asked by a magazine interviewer recently why I thought some vintage names come back and others don’t. Why Cora and Flora and not Dora? Why Edward and not Edwin? All of which got me thinking about the influences that do propel names out of the attic and into the spotlight.

The most obvious and evident of these is the celebrity factor in all its manifestations. Stars’ names, stars’ baby names and the names of characters they play:

Some examples:

ScarlettYes, the name of Miss Scarlett was used by a handful of parents following the publication of Gone With the Wind, but it wasn’t until Ms. Johansson burst on the scene that it really took off, bringing it now into the Top 50.

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posted by: waltzingmorethanmatilda View all posts by this author

By Anna Otto, Waltzing More Than Matilda

The most popular girls names of the 1940s were Margaret, Patricia, Judith, and Helen, but what were the least popular names? Here are ten names which were only chosen once in any year between 1944 and 1949 in South Australia, making them unique for their time and place. They continue to be rare, and some parents will still find them appealing.

Avis
Thought to be a Latinised form of the Germanic name Aveza, most likely a long form or elaboration of the familiar Ava. Introduced to England by the Normans, it was reasonably common in the Middle Ages, and quickly became associated with the Latin word avis, meaning “bird”. Avis Rent a Car was founded in the 1940s by Warren Avis, but did not become big in Australia for some time – it’s now quite difficult to disassociate the name Avis from the rental company, although it’s very much on trend and still seems contemporary and pretty. It was also a good fit in the 1940s, when names such as Avril and Averil were fashionable.

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