Category: unique baby names

unique baby names

by Pamela Redmond

Baby namers desperate for an original choice have always begged us for our top-secret list of names that nobody but nobody else has. You know, the truly wonderful baby names with deep history and wide appeal that somehow remain completely undiscovered.

The only problem was we didn’t have such a list….until now. Then we decided to run the new 2016 extended list of baby names from the Social Security Administration — all the baby names recorded in the US last year — against the complete list of names in our own database. What’s left is an accounting of names that were used for NO children in 2016, a collection of truly unique baby names.

But the list still contained nearly 5000 names, so we had to narrow it further. What are the best, the most usable choices among the names that were given to zero babies?

Here are our top 100 picks from our unique list of unique names. You may well find as many names here that you consider ridiculous as you feel are wonderful. But there are enough true gems in a range of styles, from deeply historic to futuristic, traditional to invented, that most adventurous baby namers will find one to suit their taste.

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By Abby Sandel

When we talk modern girl names, we’re often thinking about picks like Harper and Sloane, or Willow and Sage. They’re surname names and word names, choices that trend girl, but could just as easily be given to boys. Tailored and trim, these unique baby names feel right at home in the twenty-first century, even though many have roots in ages past.

But there’s another class of modern girl names. They’re novel – at least in the English-speaking world – and yet they’re traditionally feminine in sound.

For every Sophia and Isabella, there’s a Savannah and Aria.

Ciara and Russell Wilson recently welcomed a daughter with a modern romantic girl name: Sienna Princess Wilson.

Ciara pronounces her name like Sierra, a modern girl favorite from the 1990s. Fitting then, that she and Russell have embraced the trend for their daughter’s name, too.

Sienna comes from Siena, Italy. Heating clay from the area creates a rich red-brown color, used in artwork since before the Renaissance. That makes it a place name and a color name, too.

But the dominant quality of romantic girl names? They’re just plain pretty. With warm weather arriving, these are the sundresses of baby names.

Love Sienna? Here are nine more modern romantic names for girls.

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unusual family names

by Pamela Redmond Satran

My grandfather’s middle name was Owen, which was pretty unusual when I was growing up. I never thought back then that I’d name a son Owen, much less that Owen would become a Top 50 boys’ name!

What’s the most unusual name in your family? Can you imagine it ever coming back into style? Or maybe it’s so rare it was never in style in the first place.

We’d love to hear its origins, if you know them: How it was chosen, how the bearer felt about it, and whether Great-Uncle Oral inspired any namesakes.

We’d also love to know whether you’d consider using it as a name for a baby? A middle name? Do you love your unusual family name? Hate it? Why or why not?

For a wider look at unusual vintage baby names, check out our lists of lost names of 1916 for boys and for girls.

Get one of these awesome personalized family trees, unusual names and all, from the Etsy shop karuskicolours.

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By Linda Rosenkrantz

Continuing our series on you-don’t-have-to-be-youneek-to-be-unique names, here are 25 vintage appellations for boys that are hardly heard today.

Since boy names tend to stay on the popularity lists, these names are quite unusual in that, unlike vintage classics like William and James, most of them were in common use at one time but then slid into obscurity. See which ones you think are ripe for revival.

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Not Your Mother’s Baby Names

1950s baby names

by Pamela Redmond Satran

If your Mom (and Dad) are baffled by your baby name ideas, there’s a reason for that. Baby names that were all the way at the bottom of the extended list in 1957 — a year that saw the birth of many now grandparent-aged people — have become stylish, even popular. So when your parents say they’ve never heard that name you love, you may need to take that literally.

Every generation needs to reinvent baby names. Today’s expectant parents aren’t interested in using the names popular when they were born — Jessie and Jason, Melissa and Michael — and they’re really not interested in using names favored for their parent’s generation in the 1950s or 1960s. So Debra, Karen, Richard, and Gary, names well-represented among grandparents, are out for today’s babies.

But names that were unpopular in the Baby Boom era are a different story. In fact, the bottom of the 1957 popularity list is full of names that sound fresh, elegant, fascinating, beautiful today.

There are patterns in evidence. Names without a clear gender identification were often relegated to the bottom of the barrel back then, as were ethnic names, surname-names, word names, place names, and ancient names. All these groups are of course well-accepted now.

If your parents are eager to talk about baby names but you want to avoid a tussle over the name, share this list with them. All these names were given to only five babies in 1957 but are used for hundreds and in some cases thousands of babies now. What do you think, Mom and Dad?

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