Category: Spanish baby names

Cool Eurostyle Names for Boys

european boy names

by Pamela Redmond Satran

Nameberry has visitors from all over the world, which goes some way toward accounting for the fact that many of the names on our popularity list are more common in other countries than they are in the US. Of course, some American parents also search for international names to reflect their own ethnic heritage or to celebrate a culture or country they love or to find a more dashing way to honor Grandpa Frank.

Most of the names here, drawn from the names right below the most popular Top 1000, are European in origin and so evidence that sophisticated French or Italian or Scandinavian style. Or at least they do to the American ear, which relishes an accent.

There are also European-inflected names for boys higher up in the Nameberry popularity list: Callum and Enzo and Stellan, for instance. And in Europe itself, baby names originating in one country may be stylish in another, so that the Dutch like Italian names, the Italians favor Russian names, the Russians prefer French names, and the French are in love with British names. The boys’ names here are more distinctive than their popular brothers, but just as nimble at crossing international borders.

If you’re looking for an international name for your baby boy, these are the perfect blend of familiar yet exotic.

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150+ European Baby Girl Names

international baby girl names

by Pamela Redmond Satran

What’s so special about European names?, you might ask. After all, the majority of the baby names most widely used in the US have European origins.

But what we’re talking about here are baby names that are not widely used in the US. A diverse group of names that are largely unknown in the US yet are familiar enough that they rank just below the Nameberry Top 1000.

Search here to find a distinctive name from your family’s culture of origin. Or think of these names as a way to spark up old favorites that have perhaps grown a bit boring in their usual American incarnation. Emily may feel a lot more appealing as Emiliana and Sophronia may freshen up Sophia.

These girls’ names hail from a wide range of European countries, from Ireland to Russia, Spain to Sweden. What they have in common is a stylish European flavor that will be in good taste anywhere.

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By Linda Rosenkrantz

Now it’s the boy’s turn to romance their names.

We recently posted a list of 100 girls’ names in translation, where we took some rather prosaic appellations like Helen, Henrietta and Hedwig, and gave them some international flair via their translations into other languages. Well, several of you asked us to do the same for the boys, and so here they are. Of course there are countless other versions and variations—maybe you’ll find the honor replacement you’ve been looking for!

Ralph and Roland, meet Raoul and Orlando.

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By Linda Rosenkrantz

Why would you choose a baby name from another culture? There are several good reasons. First of all, there is the sheer beauty of so many of them. Then there is the honor factor. Say you have a beloved grandmother named Barbara you want to pay tribute to, but you can’t quite see yourself as a parent of a baby Barbara. Then how about the more vibrant Russian version, Varvara?

Or maybe there’s a name you love but find too common or popular or plain? There are countless lovely foreign variations of Elizabeth and Margaret and Katherine that are still substantive but more distinctive.

So here’s a start on the almost endless possibilities for romancing a name.

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unique girls' names

by Pamela Redmond Satran

Very feminine names that were unusual and exotic a generation or two ago have risen to the top of the US popularity lists: I’m looking at you, Isabella, Sophia, Olivia.

So what’s the parent to do who loves this kind of elaborate girls’ name but wants something a lot more rare?

Some of the best choices in this style don’t even make it onto the extended list of American baby names: All the names starred below were given to fewer than five baby girls in the US in the last year counted.  And the others were used for only a handful of babies.

Is Cassiopeia or Petronilla too much name for a baby girl (or even a grown-up woman, for that matter)? Maybe, but you can always call her Cassie or Nilla and trust she’ll grow into her august appellation, at least by the time she’s 40.

And if you like super-feminine names for girls, why stick with the safe Gabriellas and Valentinas when there are all these exotic beauties out there?

Thirty rare, feminine names you might consider for your little girl are:

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