Category: Spanish baby names

Cool Eurostyle Names for Boys

european boy names

by Pamela Redmond Satran

Nameberry has visitors from all over the world, which goes some way toward accounting for the fact that many of the names on our popularity list are more common in other countries than they are in the US. Of course, some American parents also search for international names to reflect their own ethnic heritage or to celebrate a culture or country they love or to find a more dashing way to honor Grandpa Frank.

Most of the names here, drawn from the names right below the most popular Top 1000, are European in origin and so evidence that sophisticated French or Italian or Scandinavian style. Or at least they do to the American ear, which relishes an accent.

There are also European-inflected names for boys higher up in the Nameberry popularity list: Callum and Enzo and Stellan, for instance. And in Europe itself, baby names originating in one country may be stylish in another, so that the Dutch like Italian names, the Italians favor Russian names, the Russians prefer French names, and the French are in love with British names. The boys’ names here are more distinctive than their popular brothers, but just as nimble at crossing international borders.

If you’re looking for an international name for your baby boy, these are the perfect blend of familiar yet exotic.

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unique girls' names

by Pamela Redmond Satran

Very feminine names that were unusual and exotic a generation or two ago have risen to the top of the US popularity lists: I’m looking at you, Isabella, Sophia, Olivia.

So what’s the parent to do who loves this kind of elaborate girls’ name but wants something a lot more rare?

Some of the best choices in this style don’t even make it onto the extended list of American baby names: All the names starred below were given to fewer than five baby girls in the US in the last year counted.  And the others were used for only a handful of babies.

Is Cassiopeia or Petronilla too much name for a baby girl (or even a grown-up woman, for that matter)? Maybe, but you can always call her Cassie or Nilla and trust she’ll grow into her august appellation, at least by the time she’s 40.

And if you like super-feminine names for girls, why stick with the safe Gabriellas and Valentinas when there are all these exotic beauties out there?

Thirty rare, feminine names you might consider for your little girl are:

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a Name Sage post by: Abby View all Name Sage posts

Mary writes:

I am due in July with baby number two, a girl. My husband and I are having a difficult time agreeing on names.

We are looking at both English and Spanish baby names. My husband’s only condition is that it can be pronounced easily in both Spanish and English. I am a little more flexible in that my only requirement is that it not be too popular.

Our surname ends with “-in” and while our son’s name is Julian, this time we’d like to steer away from similar sounding names. M names are also out due to our surname.

I love Sofia, Isabel, and Camila but find them all to be a bit too popular. I also really love Beatrice/Beatrix and Noelle, but my husband isn’t a fan of these two names.

He likes Naomi, Elena, and Natalia but I’m on the fence about all three. I also like Eliana, but it almost breaks my rule about not sounding too much like our last name, and it might be too close to our son’s name.

Is there a way to make popular names work without sacrificing that unique feeling of a rare name?

The Name Sage replies:

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Most Popular Spanish Baby Names

By Jessica Jones, the local.com

Lucía and Hugo are the top baby names in Spain.

The most popular Spanish baby names have been revealed by Spain’s national statistics office, with parents choosing more traditional names over modern monikers.

Spain’s national statistics office (INE) has released a list of the 100 most popular baby names in 2013 (the most up to date data) and the trend is still very much geared towards the traditional.

The information, released on Wednesday, showed the most popular names of the 425,390 births registered in Spain in 2013.

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posted by: waltzingmorethanmatilda View all posts by this author

By Anna Otto, Waltzing More Than Matilda

I recently released an e-book called International Baby Names for Australian Parents, to help Australian parents find names that are uncommon, but not strange. My theory was that was a name that had never ranked here, yet was on the charts in other countries, would fit the bill of being seen as both “unusual” and “normal”.

Here are some names from the book that have never ranked in English-speaking countries, but are in the Top 100 elsewhere in the world.

girls

Anouk (Top 100 in the Netherlands)

Hip and quirky while still having substance. As a short form of Anna, provides an alternative to that and related names.

Ginevra (Top 100 in Italy)

Best known from spunky redhead GinevraGinny” Weasley in the Harry Potter books. Romantic and with tons of nickname options, this could also honour a Jennifer, as it’s the Italian form of Guinevere.

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