Category: Southern baby names

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Sweet Southern Girl Names

a Name Sage post by: Abby View all Name Sage posts
sweet girl names

If it’s a boy, they’re all set. But if it’s a girl, Sarah and her husband need a sweetly Southern name to match Titus James and Haddie Mae.

Sarah writes:

Our son’s name is Titus James and our daughter’s name is Haddie Mae. We are currently expecting our third baby and won’t find out the gender until birth. If it is a boy, we plan to name him Shepherd John. But we are stuck for girl names!

I like names that are not super popular, but recognizable enough that people could read it or write it with no problem. I lean toward names that have been around for 100 years and will still be around in 100 more (i.e., no new or trendy names). My husband likes girl names that sound more classic and Southern, but he doesn’t care if it’s trendy or not.

Names we have considered:

Savannah – My husband’s favorite. I like it a lot, too, but I wonder if there’s something similar but less popular out there?

Scarlett– Another name my husband loves that feels similar to Savannah, but I like it less.

Other names on the list that we liked but aren’t sure if we love: Sutton, Noelle, Quinn, Coraline, and Cordelia, Delia for short.

Do you have any suggestions for less popular names that would fit our style?

The Name Sage replies:

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posted by: Abby View all posts by this author

By Abby Sandel

Mardi Gras is tomorrow, and in New Orleans, that means one thing: a parade featuring Rex, King of Carnival.  Mardi Gras parades begin days earlier, and every parade organization – called a krewe – has its royalty.  But Rex and his Queen, along with their court of Maids, Dukes, and Pages, occupy a special place in the revels.

Rex traces its roots to 1872, and their royals have been drawn from the most prominent of New Orleans families.  The men named Rex are accomplished civic leaders; their consorts are chosen from the season’s debutantes.

Over the years, Rex and his court have worn some fascinating names – a mix of old Southern tradition and French influence.  Here are some of my favorites, drawn from decades of Mardi Gras’ reigning royals:

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posted by: Aimee Tafreshi View all posts by this author

By Aimee Reneau Tafreshi

Some baby names call to mind sweet tea savored on a porch rocking chair overlooking Spanish moss-covered trees on a humid summer day. If you are looking for the perfect baby name for your Southern belle or gent, look no further. After living in Texas, South Carolina, Georgia and Florida, I have enjoyed hearing different variations of uniquely southern names. Some I have heard myself; others are among the most frequently bestowed names in the southern states, and some I just associate with the South.

Rhett is a distinctly southern name, as the love interest of Scarlett O’Hara in Gone with the Wind, and is a strong and timeless choice. My husband’s boss is named Rhett, as well as an older woman who lives down the street. As with Scarlett, the South can’t get enough of Rhett.

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Hyperlocal is a word you hear a lot today. There’s hyperlocal news and hyperlocal food, hyperlocal weather and hyperlocal — yeah, baby names.

What are the name trends where you live? Which popular names ring through every playground and crowd every class list? What kinds of names are considered cool, and what names do you NEVER hear?

In my diverse liberal suburb of New York City, for instance, names that are ethnically distinctive and unconventional when it comes to gender identity are definitely cool. Names you hear a lot include Henry (there are three on my short block), Zoe, Izzy, and my younger son’s name, Owen.

Please tell us where you live to help put your hyperlocal baby names report in context. If you’re not comfortable revealing your exact locale, you can say “a gentrifying neighborhood of London” or “a prosperous town in Silicon Valley.” But something vaguer like “a conservative small town in New England” works too.

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A Girl Named Ellis

unisex names

On a recent trip through the South, I met two young sisters charmingly named Mason and Ellis.  Surname-names for girls are characteristic of the traditional South, where family last names have long been passed down as firsts to girls as well as boys.

Little girls might well have a conventional first name like Mary or Elizabeth, but their full name is Mary Ellis (say) and they’re known as Ellis.  The Mary or the Elizabeth might be mom and/or grandmother’s name; it’s the Ellis part that makes the name distinct.

Of course, surname-names are used for girls in many places beyond the American South these days, though not everyone likes the practice.  Boys’ names should be left to the boys, some feel, and girls’ names should be decidedly feminine, and unisex names are all-around unappealing.

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