Category: science baby names

Abby Berry Juice profile image

Science-Inspired Surname Names

a Name Sage post by: Abby View all Name Sage posts

They chose surname names for their first two sons. Now they’re considering Edison for a third boy. Is it just the right mix of science and style? Or is there a better name out there?

Olivia writes:

I am due in May with our third boy. Our other sons are named Lincoln and Sullivan. We wanted something that fits nicely with that sibling set, preferably a surname as a first name, and preferably with a science “flavour” to it. Our surname ends in “er” which rules out nearly all names ending in “er” as it sounds too rhyme-y.

After scouring Nameberry for hours and then whittling down our list (including amazing names like Huxley and Forest) we have settled on Edison. We both love it, but I can’t help feeling like there is a better name out there. I never had this niggling feeling with my first two son’s names!

I am slightly concerned that having three names ending in “n” could be a bit cheesy. Am I overthinking? I feel like I need permission to stop looking, or some assurance that we haven’t missed a hidden gem and Edison is indeed the most perfect name for us.

Please help!

The Name Sage replies:

Read More

emilygc3 Berry Juice profile image

Futuristic Baby Names from Classic SciFi

posted by: emilygc3 View all posts by this author

By Emily Cardoza, NothingLikeaName

Although the new name data for 2015 won’t be announced till May, I’ve seen a lot of name blogs and websites making predictions for what the new top names are going to be.  We’re certainly not the first writers to imagine names from the future! Below I’ve included some of the most well-known sci-fi books about the future, and the names chosen for their characters.

Read More

Nerdy Namesakes: Brilliant Biologists

posted by: Callmecalliope View all posts by this author

By Jackie at Namesplash 

As a recent biology grad, I have many an idol in the field. Would I deliberately name my child after one of them? Doubtful, but there is certainly a wide variety of wonderful names to choose from!

Charles Darwin (Shown in illustration) English naturalist most notable for his contribution to evolution theory. Charles is a classic on the upswing, and Darwin is quirky yet dapper.

James Watson One of the first, along with Crick, Franklin, and Maurice Wilkins, to recognize the double helical structure of DNA. I can’t see sweet and sophisticated James ever going out of style.Watson would make an interesting choice for the daring namer, and would fit in with popular surname names.

Francis Crick- Collaborated with Watson in the discovery of the double helical structure of DNA.Francis is dated, but could be usable, considering the vintage trend. I cannot bring myself to advocate for naming a child Crick!

Rosalind Franklin An X-ray crystallographer whose X-ray diffraction images led Watson and Crick to their realization of the structure of DNA. Franklin died at the age of 37, and therefore did not share in the Nobel Prize awarded for the work. Her contribution to the discovery and status as a pioneering figure for young women in science continue to be recognized nonetheless. Rosalind would be a beautiful, sophisticated vintage choice. Franklin may be so old it’s new again.

Carl Linnaeus- (Also Carolus Linnaeus and Carl Von Linne) Known as the father of modern taxonomy. Carl is clean and simple; Linnaeus might be a bit out there. The female name Linnea, however, comes from the genus name for the twinflower, which is named for Linnaeus himself.Linnaea would be a usable alternate spelling.

Thomas Huxley An English biologist nicknamed “Darwin’s Bulldog” for his public support of Darwin’s ideas. Thomas is a great classic, and Huxley would make a unique, modern choice, with Huck as a potential nickname.

Gregor Mendel The “father of modern genetics,” Mendel is best known for discovering the laws of inheritance by studying pea plants. I find Gregor to be a darling international option. Mendel would be an unusual and very obvious reference.

Elizabeth Blackburn A molecular biologist who has made important contributions to the study of telomeres and the telomerase enzyme. You can never go wrong with a sophisticated classic likeElizabeth, and it has such a great variety of nicknames!

Frederick Sanger– The winner of two Nobel Prizes, Sanger made important strides in the areas of protein structure and DNA sequencing. While Frederick is a handsome choice, Sanger is a bit much for me. But hey, there were 7 Sadler’s, 8 Satchel’s, and 7 Sender’s born last year, so maybe Sanger will appeal to someone.

Kary Mullis A major contributor to the improvement of the polymerase chain reaction, an important method for amplifying DNA sequences. Both Kary and Mullis would make unique, potentially unisex choices.

Matthias Schleiden A German botanist best known for his contribution to cell theory, along with Theodor Schwann and Rudolph Virchow. I think Matthias is a very accessible international option. It’s off the grid and fairly rare in the USA, yet it’s stylish and on-trend. With its connection to Matthew, Matthias suits the ‘different, not weird’ criteria perfectly!

I do regret the lack of females on this list. Of course, the list is not comprehensive, and I hope that with these ladies paving the way, there will be even more wonderfully-named women to add in the years to come!

Feel free to add your own favorite biologist’s name to the list!

Read More

Abby Berry Juice profile image

Seeking a Science-Inspired Name

a Name Sage post by: Abby View all Name Sage posts

Liz writes:

I’m a math teacher and science lover, my husband is a history teacher and literary enthusiast. We are expecting our second son, and looking for something that can go with our first son’s name: Truman King, Tru for short.

We’re hoping for a name with ties to science, history, or both. And, because we’re teachers, we’re looking for an unusual name – something we won’t associate with a former student.

Our short list includes Wiles (after the mathematician) and Kepler, but we’re looking for more ideas.

We all know people who color our ideas about a name, for good or otherwise. But teachers have a special challenge, don’t they? They meet dozens of children every year – more, for teachers in upper grades. And their students inevitably shade the way they think about baby names.

Read More

posted by: Callmecalliope View all posts by this author

By Jackie, aka CallmeCalliope at namesplash 

Many of us find surnames especially attractive as firsts, though it can be tricky to find a perfectly balanced name that fits the trend but isn’t too popular. It’s also a plus when a name has a vibrant history or meaningful reference attached to it. Here, I’ve compiled a list of unique and eye-catching surnames of some of the most iconic physicists and astronomers in history.

Read More