Category: question of the week

Would you name your daughter after her dad?

Our Question of the Week:

Last week, Serena Williams introduced the world to her adorable two-week-old daughter in an Instagram post. The baby’s name, she revealed, was Alexis. A perfectly nice, normal name; popular, but not too popular, at Number 119. But here’s the unusual part: The newborn’s father is also named Alexis. And the new parents made the namesake connection explicit by giving the little girl the name Alexis Olympia Ohania Jr.

This isn’t completely unprecedented; our very own Name Sage wrote about a family that did the same thing two years ago. But it’s certainly unusual, and Serena Williams may be the highest-profile parent to name a baby girl after her father. She did tweak it by changing the middle name from dad’s Kerry to her very own Olympia, a name appropriate for the daughter of a winner of four Olympic gold medals. And, to avoid any confusion, Olympia is what she will be called.

But what’s your take on this idea for parents who don’t happen to be one of the greatest athletes of all time?

Do you think more parents ought to name little girls after their dads? And what about the boys? Could a baby boy be named after his grandma Jessie?

How about tweaking the dad-daughter name, say from Theodore to Theodora? And do you think the Jr. suffix makes sense in this case?

Let us know your answers in the comments, and continue the conversation on Twitter or Facebook!

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One of the big recent baby name successes has been Ophelia. After nearly 60 years off the Top 1000, it reemerged in 2015 at Number 975, then jumped to 580 last year. Though it hasn’t yet beaten its peak from the turn of the 20th century, when it entered the Top 300, Ophelia ranks a stunning Number 15 among Nameberry users for the first half of 2017, so it’s almost certain to climb even higher in the U.S..

We get the appeal. It sounds unusual but graceful, it starts with the trendy letter O and it has a sterling literary pedigree, coined by Shakespeare himself.

But here’s the thing about that Shakespeare tie: In Hamlet, Ophelia is a central tragic victim, the girl driven to madness and suicide, but she doesn’t have much presence in the play. Shakespeare created dozens of strong, fascinating, brilliant female characters — but Ophelia isn’t one of them.

Yet today’s parents have decided that Ophelia‘s many positive qualities outweigh the grimness of her story. The same goes for Pandora, Abel and Persephone, all of which have started climbing up the charts.

So that’s our question: How much do you care about a name’s backstory? Are there any names you love because they have great stories behind them? Or have you ever rejected a name because of its history?

Let us know your answers in the comments, and continue the conversation on Twitter or Facebook!

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The first clue about the names of Beyonce and Jay-Z’s twins came in the form of an unusual document: A trademark application for the newborns’ names. Less than two weeks after giving birth, the couple filed the application to use the names Rumi and Sir on, as People put it, “everything from fragrances and cosmetics to baby gear, tote bags and water bottles.”

While few non-celebrity parents are likely to follow suit, the Carters’ trademark application does raise an interesting question.  In a world where over 350,000 babies are born every day, does it make sense for parents to claim the territory tied to their newborns’ names?

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What’s Your Favorite Name Era?

By Linda Rosenkrantz

Most of us name lovers, even those who are fans of new, cutting-edge monikers, also have an affinity for names of the past. But which part of the past? There are so many possibilities!

Ancient names like Cassius?

Medievals like Isolde?

Puritan names like Prudence?

Frilly Victorian Valentine names ?

Gay 90s nicknames such as Millie and Minnie and Archie?

The Downton Abbey World War I era of Violets and Ediths and Coras?

Midcentury/Mad-Men-type faves–Roger, Sally, Peggy?

The more recent past when names like Amy and Amanda, Jason and Joshua ruled?

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unusual family names

by Pamela Redmond Satran

My grandfather’s middle name was Owen, which was pretty unusual when I was growing up. I never thought back then that I’d name a son Owen, much less that Owen would become a Top 50 boys’ name!

What’s the most unusual name in your family? Can you imagine it ever coming back into style? Or maybe it’s so rare it was never in style in the first place.

We’d love to hear its origins, if you know them: How it was chosen, how the bearer felt about it, and whether Great-Uncle Oral inspired any namesakes.

We’d also love to know whether you’d consider using it as a name for a baby? A middle name? Do you love your unusual family name? Hate it? Why or why not?

For a wider look at unusual vintage baby names, check out our lists of lost names of 1916 for boys and for girls.

Get one of these awesome personalized family trees, unusual names and all, from the Etsy shop karuskicolours.

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