Category: popular baby names

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Playing it Safe Baby Names

a Name Sage post by: Abby View all Name Sage posts

They have a shortlist for their first child, but they’re torn. Do they use a long-time favorite? Stick with something more classic? Or start from scratch?

L. writes:

We are expecting our first baby later this year, a girl, and we are stuck on names.

For many years, I thought I would name my future daughter Chloe. My husband is okay with Chloe, but Olivia is his current favorite. I also like Olivia, but I’m not sure it’s “the one.”

We’ve also considered Whitley (but my husband doesn’t like it), Lauren, and Kinsley. When I read comments about the name Kinsley, it is mostly negative. Could I pull off a name I like but others will hate? Will I regret not using Chloe? Do I play it safe with Olivia? Go classic with Lauren?

I have read countless name lists and I go round and round with this same handful of names. Popular Nameberry suggestions such as Margot, Clementine, and Eliza don’t appeal to me.

Please help!

The Name Sage replies:

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The Great-Grandparents Baby Name Rule

By Nancy Man

A baby name becomes trendy for one generation. For the next two generations, while those initial babies are parent-aged and grandparent-aged, you can expect the name to go out of style. But during the third generation, once the cohort reaches great-grandparent age, the name is free to come back into fashion.

Evelyn is a name with a usage pattern that fits this description well.

I’ve seen it described elsewhere as the 100-Year Rule, but I prefer to call it the Great-Grandparent Rule, as it makes more sense to me to frame it in terms of generations.

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By Kelli Brady

Now that the dust has settled on the new Social Security list, we’ve had time to dig deeper into the data, so let’s analyze the 2016 Top 100! Here are the most interesting finds, looking at some of the individual names!

NEW GIRLS: Adeline, Elena, Eliana, Kinsley, Luna, and Willow.

NEW BOYS: Bryson, Greyson, Leonardo, and Roman.

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Baby Name News of the Week

By Clare Bristow

It’s been another week of new discoveries about Americans’ favorite names in 2016.

The big news was the release of the top names in every state. If you’re based in the US and concerned about the popularity of a name, you may want to know how it ranks in your state as well as nationally, because there can be big local differences.

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by Pamela Redmond, with research by Joe Satran

If you want to give your baby a name that transcends this decade, make sure it doesn’t start with Ad-, end with –ley, contain the letter x, or honor a star who suffered a tragic death.

That’s what we found when we analyzed the Social Security baby names data of 2016 versus 2006 and identified which names have exploded in use over the past ten years and how those combine to create the major baby name trends of the decade.

Juniper and Jayceon, according to our research, may well prove as emblematic of these times as Jennifer and Jason were of the 1970s. The 40 names that have increased the most in usage over the past ten years – which also include Adalynn and Brantley, Monroe and Hendrix – may sound fresh and stylish now, but are likely to become the Brittany and Brian of the future.

Here, our statistical analysis of the dominant baby name trends of the decade and the hot baby names that influenced them.

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