Category: new york baby names

Quirky Favorite Baby Names by State

quirky favorite names

Which quirky favorite baby names does YOUR state love above all others? We crunched the numbers and came up with these top names in each state — not the most popular in terms of sheer numbers, but the unusual, distinctive baby names that get an outsized amount of love in each place.

Insiders know the reasons behind many of the picks. Bexley, the girls’ quirky favorite name in Ohio, comes from the name of an upscale suburb, for example, while Wisconsin’s favorite boys’ name Jordy honors Green Bay Packer Jordy Nelson. Woodsy Vermonters favor nature names Wren and Wilder, while Spanish names Santana and Estevan rule in New Mexico.

Click through to find out the Quirky Favorite Names in your state — and all the rest.

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Big Apple Baby Names

There are countless reasons to visit New York City.  Museums to visit and galleries to hop.  Great theater, opera and ballet. Sights to see, people to watch and fashion-forward stores to shop. But it turns out there’s another, less expected thing to shop for—and that’s a Manhattan-inspired baby name.

We’ve looked at some of the street names before–a Manhattan avenue, after all, was the inspiration for the extraordinary success of the name Madison— but a thread on our own forums, “Need a Big Apple Middle Name” a while back inspired us to us to look beyond the street signs of NYC for other places and people that are quintessentially Gotham.

PLACES—nabes, rivers, parks, etc

Ansonia hotel and then apartments

Apollo Theater

Bethesda Fountain, in Central Park

Bryant Park

Cedar Tavern—watering hole of Abstract Expressionist painters

Chelsea

Chumley’s– legendary writers’ hangout

Cleopatra’s Needle—obelisk in Central Park

Cooper Union

Dakota Apartments

Duffy Square

Finn Square

Grace Church

Gracie Square and Mansion

Harlem

Henry Street Settlement

Hudson River—and Street

Isham Park

Judson Memorial Church, scene of early art world ‘happenings’

Lenox Hill and Avenue

Lincoln Center

Nolita (acronym for North of Little Italy)

Sardi‘s–show biz restaurant

Sheridan Square

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

Whitney Museum

…and a few of the best Manhattan street names

Astor Place

Baxter Street

Carmine Street

Christopher Street

Cornelia Street

Crosby Street

Delancey Street

Fletcher Street

Henry Street

Horatio Street

Hudson Street

Houston Street (pronounced HOW-ston)

Jane Street

Mercer Street

Milligan Place

Minetta Lane, Tavern

Oliver Street

Pearl Street

Sullivan Street

Sutton Place

Thayer Street

Varick Street

Waverly Place

PEOPLE—just a few of the countless notables who were born, lived, or are otherwise associated with the Big Apple

Althea Gibson— tennis champ, grew up in Harlem

Ambrose Kingsland, NYC mayor, 1851-53

AudenW.H.– poet and long-time Village resident

Cass Gilbert–architect of the Woolworth Building

Clay Felker– founder of New York magazine

Cole Porter–composer of the song “I Happen to Like New York

Dawn Powell— Prohibition-era New York novelist

Djuna Barnes–wrote Greenwich Village As It Is

Ebenezer Wilson, NYC mayor, 1707-10

Edna St. Vincent MillayPulitzer Prize-winning poet , Greenwich Village resident

Elisha Graves Otis— elevator inventor, responsible for the verticality of New York

Emma Lazarus, her poem is inscribed on the Statue of Liberty

Eustace Tilley—monocled cartoon symbol of The New Yorker

Fiorello La Guardia, three-term mayor in the 1930s and 40s

Gideon Lee, NYC mayor, 1833-34

Humphrey Bogartgrew up on West 103rd Street

Jackson Pollock— painter who lived in Greenwich Village before moving to the Hamptons

Langston Hughes—key figure in the Harlem Renaissance

Lennon, John—lived and died in New York

Matthias Nicoll–NYC mayor, 1672-73

Nellie Blyearly bold investigative journalist in the New York World newspaper

Poe, Edgar Allan–in addition to his literary achievements, was editor of The Broadway Journal

Tallulah Bankhead–Broadway actress and sometime member of the “Algonquin Round Table”

Truman Capote–moved to New York at the age of 17

Zora Neale Hurston—writer, a major figure in the Harlem Renaissance

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Like Jenny-from-the-block (well maybe not quite), I was a roller-skating, rope-jumping, potsy- (hopscotch to you) playing child of the Bronx streets.  At that time I was completely unaware of how the mostly pretentious –sounding names of those streets might have referred back to past heroic figures (Popham?  Burnside? Bathgate?).  In my mind what they were identified with was the kids I knew who lived on them—Nelson Avenue was associated with the Mazur sisters, Jessup with my classmate Nancy, Loring with my bf Margery’s grandmother, and Shakespeare with my elementary school.

(One name that fascinated me and couldn’t be ignored was Featherbed Lane, a street that I passed on the way to school every day and was home to my Aunt Pearl and family.  It was only later that I discovered the probable origins of the name—that during the Revolutionary War, locals covered the street with feather beds so that the soldiers fighting the British could move quietly through the area—though there were other explanations as well.)

Here are some of the mostly surname names from my neighborhood and beyond:

ANDREWS

ANTHONY

BRANDT

CEDAR

CLIFFORD

CRESTON

DAVIDSON

(Mt) EDEN

FORDHAM

GERARD

HARRISON

HENNESSEY

JEROME

JESSUP

LORING

MONTGOMERY

MORRIS

MORTON

NELSON

OSBORNE

PELHAM

PHELAN

SELWYN

SHAKESPEARE

VALENTINE

WALTON

WEBSTER

During my childhood, if you were from the Bronx, it was practically in your DNA to hate all things Brooklyn.  But now that I’ve matured into a more rational and objective name observer, I do have to admit that that other borough does have  a better selection of street names—less stuffy and a lot more that are actually suited  to a baby.  In fact there are so many Courts and Places with standard first names that you have to wonder if the streets weren’t named after the builders’ own babies.

Here’s a selection—there are lots more:

AINSLIE

ALABAMA

ALBANY

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Unique New York Baby Names!

We got a call yesterday from Don Kaplan, a reporter for the New York Post, who’s doing a story about unique New York (remember that tongue twister?) baby names.

Don spent the past week poring over a quarter million names — yes, many of them pretty crazy — given to New York babies over the past few years. Examples include, with a New York theme, Harlem, Manhattan, and Bronx; with a sports angle, Jeter and LeBron; and with a religious bent, Rabbi, Priest, and Jesuskingoftheworld.

You’ve got your Sully, after the pilot who successfully landed a plane in the Hudson River, and your Matisyahu, after the hip-hop star. There’s a Royalty, a Success, and a Winner; a Tolkien and one poor boy whose name is Mudd.

And now Don is reaching out to find out YOUR unique New York baby name. If you are a New York City parent who’s given your child a distinctive baby name with a pop culture inspiration, Don wants to hear what it is and how you chose it. You can tell your stories here and/or contact Don directly at dkaplan@nypost.com, 212-930-8656.

And sure, if you want to tattle on your neighbors who named their baby Keeno or just share a crazy New York baby-naming story, tell us that too.

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New York Baby Names

Journalist and New York City mom Laura Dunphy reports that the pressure is on for Gotham parents to choose baby names that are more creative, more unusual, cooler than those anyone else is using. But no matter how hard you try, you still might not make it.

Ah, New York, New York.  If you can make it here, you can make it anywhere.  And if you can name your baby here without needing therapy or Xanax, then I applaud you.

That’s because like everything else in NYC, baby naming is intense.  If most people think naming children is a pleasant activity, like badminton or a picnic, Manhattanites treat it as a competitive sport, like rugby or bond trading.

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