Category: namesakes

Would you name your daughter after her dad?

Our Question of the Week:

Last week, Serena Williams introduced the world to her adorable two-week-old daughter in an Instagram post. The baby’s name, she revealed, was Alexis. A perfectly nice, normal name; popular, but not too popular, at Number 119. But here’s the unusual part: The newborn’s father is also named Alexis. And the new parents made the namesake connection explicit by giving the little girl the name Alexis Olympia Ohania Jr.

This isn’t completely unprecedented; our very own Name Sage wrote about a family that did the same thing two years ago. But it’s certainly unusual, and Serena Williams may be the highest-profile parent to name a baby girl after her father. She did tweak it by changing the middle name from dad’s Kerry to her very own Olympia, a name appropriate for the daughter of a winner of four Olympic gold medals. And, to avoid any confusion, Olympia is what she will be called.

But what’s your take on this idea for parents who don’t happen to be one of the greatest athletes of all time?

Do you think more parents ought to name little girls after their dads? And what about the boys? Could a baby boy be named after his grandma Jessie?

How about tweaking the dad-daughter name, say from Theodore to Theodora? And do you think the Jr. suffix makes sense in this case?

Let us know your answers in the comments, and continue the conversation on Twitter or Facebook!

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Name Sage: Girl Name Honoring Jacob

a Name Sage post by: Abby View all Name Sage posts

Jennifer writes:

I am due soon with our third child and my husband and I are having some problems finalizing a name.  We have a common Jewish last name (also popular as a first name).  

We have two children, Milo Efrem and Reva Whitney.  While their names did take us some time to get to, we were in agreement and the process seemed easier than this time around.  Since my husband and I both have very common names, we wanted names for our children that are not overused but also not weird.

We are fairly settled on Iris for a first name, in honor of my Uncle Ira.  We would like the middle name to honor my husband’s grandfather, Jacob, called Jack, or the Hebrew version of his name, Yacob. 

My husband really likes Jaclyn or Jackie, but I have bad associations with this name and I can’t get on board.  I have been searching the baby name lists but nothing seems right.  I am open to names inspired by the honoree, without directly using the first letter, but I know my husband won’t go for something too non-traditional. 

Can you offer some other suggestions?  Or should I just learn to love Jaclyn?

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By Brooke Cussans, Baby Name Pondering

Last week marked the 50th anniversary of ‘Doctor Who‘, the highly anticipated special anniversary episode watched by avid fans (or Whovians) worldwide. The show captivated audiences from the start with its’ creativity and imaginative story lines that attracted viewers. The last of his race, the Doctor travels through time and space in his blue police box spaceship the TARDIS , regenerating each time he dies.

He travels with many different companions, many of whom are beloved by fans and have received their own spin-off shows, but the true heart of the show is the Doctor. With each regeneration the Doctor has the same memories but a distinct and different personality, meaning that each actor can put their unique stamp on the role, and all have become household names. If you’re a fan, perhaps you may like to honor your child with the name of your favorite Doctor.

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Baby Names 2013: 14 top trend predictions

Baby names are changing faster than ever, influenced by celebrities and pop culture, ancient religions and modern catastrophes.  The major trends for 2013 draw from the names of Roman gods and the wilder side of nature, tap new international name sources and include a surprising taste for secrecy.

Nameberry’s predictions for  baby names 2013:

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Megan , who lives just outside Philadelphia, is expecting her first boy after two little girls in June. Her daughters both have family names, but now her husband, Thomas IV, would like to continue the tradition of naming the boys in his family Thomas, making their son Thomas V. Problem is, mom’s not too keen.

Can you help her find a family name everyone will agree on? Or should she give in to hubby’s desire for a V? She writes:

“We are expecting our third baby and first boy in June.  It was easy to name our daughters – Aubryn Elizabeth (age 4) was named for my maternal grandmother and Margaret Jane (nn: Maisie, age 20 months) was named for my paternal grandmother and my mother.

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