Category: baby names from books

By Kristian Wilson

With a spot atop Amazon’s bestseller list and Hulu’s faithful adaptation of the novel recently hitting the small screen, Margaret Atwood’s 1985 novel The Handmaid’s Tale is all anyone can talk about in 2017, so now is the perfect time to think about all the great baby names we can glean from this speculative-fiction masterpiece. Check out the literary baby names from The Handmaid’s Tale I’ve selected for you below.

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a Name Sage post by: Abby View all Name Sage posts

They love the name Gus for one of their twin sons. But with a big sister named Hazel, will others find fault with the YA literary reference?

Amanda writes:

We are expecting twin boys in early April and still have not decided on names. Naming our daughter was a stressful experience for me, so now having to name two at once is bringing the pressure.

I definitely want something to complement our daughter’s name, Hazel. Not only is it classic, but with my husband and I both being teachers it is so difficult to choose a name that we haven’t had in the classroom.

We are all but sold on the name Jack. Even though it is a bit too popular for my liking, everything else about the name just feels right. Other names we have thought about include Axel, Archer, Griffin, Grey, Drew, and Gus.

My personal favorite is Gus, however I recently discovered that the two main characters in the book The Fault in our Stars were Hazel and Gus. Now I’m wondering if that would be weird since those characters fell in love with each other. Am I thinking too hard on this? I truly am stuck. Any and all advice would be appreciated!

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Who Knew Victor Hugo was a Name Nerd?

posted by: ClareB View all posts by this author

By Clare Bristow

Victor Hugo, the nineteenth-century French writer best known for Les Misérables and The Hunchback of Notre-Dame, was a keen observer of people and society. I’d wager he was something of a name enthusiast, too.

His books contain not just memorably-named characters, but also a lot of comments on names.

If someone has an unusual name, it usually has a back story. For example, Quasimodo, the Hunchback of Notre-Dame, was named after the first word in the liturgy on the day he was found as an infant.

Hugo’s characters talk about names, their own and others, just like we do in real life. In Notre-Dame, a group of women laugh at Esmeralda’s outlandish name (although they can hardly talk, with names like Amelotte, Colombe, Mahiette and Oudarde). Elsewhere, a man called Félix complains that his name is a lie because he is not happy.

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How J.K. Rowling Names Her Characters

By Meredith Testa, Namenculture

J.K. Rowling has been profiled on Nameberry several times, and with good reason- she’s as creative a namer as she is a writer. She draws character names from literature, mythology, history, astronomy, and countless international languages. No character is named haphazardly; families have consistent naming patterns (like the celestial Blacks and the floral Evanses) and individual characters’ names match their personas. Below are some of the best-named characters in the series.

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The Return of Lemony Snicket

By Linda Rosenkrantz

Lemony Snicket has just made a welcome return appearance, via Netflix, reminding us of what an inventive namer his creator (nee Daniel Handler) is—kind of a cross between C. Dickens and JK Rowling. Personally, I’m crazy about some of the incredible surnames in the series—Baudelaire, Caliban, Poe, Quagmire, and especially the use of the word Denouement as a name.

As for the first names, there are lots of classics, especially for the boys—Albert, Arthur, Charles, Frank and Phil—and some trendy girls’ names as well, such as Olivia and Violet, but there are some more uncommon examples as well. Let’s have a look at names from the whole series.

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