Category: names for girls

posted by: TulipByAnyName View all posts by this author

By Meagan Burke

Alfred Hitchcock, often referred to as the “Master of Suspense,” worked with forty-seven lead actresses in his five decades of filmmaking, many of them evidence of his penchant for cool blondes. Let’s explore seven of his most memorable leading ladies.

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posted by: Tiana Putric View all posts by this author

By Tiana Putric

International Women’s Day is observed all around the world each year on March 8th. This year’s theme calls on all of us to #BeBoldForChange. Meet twelve recent female history makers from Australia to Germany to Jamaica to Switzerland –– many of whom currently hold their country’s highest office and were the first woman to do so.

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By Pamela Redmond Satran

Kindergarten teachers across the US are learning the names of all their new students, which might present an especially big challenge this year.

Children entering school this fall were most likely born in 2010 or 2011, when the Number 1 names both years were Jacob for boys and Sophia for girls. (Even when Isabella took first place in 2010, Sophia and Sofia together outnumbered her.) That makes nearly 100,000 children named Jacob, Sophia, or Sofia starting kindergarten this fall, an average of 2000 in every state.

If you throw Jake and Sophie into the mix, that’s nearly as many children as were named Michael and Jennifer in 1983, the year today’s average kindergarten parent was born. Welcome to school, new generation of kids destined to be known as Jacob R. and Sophia W.

Other kindergarten students most likely to have a last initial appended to their popular first names are little boys named Ethan, William, and Jayden, and girls called Emma, Olivia, and Ava.

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By Linda Rosenkrantz

Many girls’ names come in two forms: a straightforward version ending in e and a more romantic variation with a final a. And these tend to move in and out of fashion as a group, reflecting the tenor of the time.

Right now, we are in a relatively elaborate era, with few parents picking girls’ names like Julie over Julia or Diane over Diana.

But I have a hunch that we’re moving into a more evenly divided time, with the rising of names like Olive and Sophie and Sylvie.

Let’s take a look at some more examples.

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unique girls' names

by Pamela Redmond Satran

Very feminine names that were unusual and exotic a generation or two ago have risen to the top of the US popularity lists: I’m looking at you, Isabella, Sophia, Olivia.

So what’s the parent to do who loves this kind of elaborate girls’ name but wants something a lot more rare?

Some of the best choices in this style don’t even make it onto the extended list of American baby names: All the names starred below were given to fewer than five baby girls in the US in the last year counted.  And the others were used for only a handful of babies.

Is Cassiopeia or Petronilla too much name for a baby girl (or even a grown-up woman, for that matter)? Maybe, but you can always call her Cassie or Nilla and trust she’ll grow into her august appellation, at least by the time she’s 40.

And if you like super-feminine names for girls, why stick with the safe Gabriellas and Valentinas when there are all these exotic beauties out there?

Thirty rare, feminine names you might consider for your little girl are:

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