Category: name spellings

By Kelli Brady 

Aiden and the –aiden boys’ names have been all the rage since the turn of the century. Have you ever wondered about the history of the name trend? Which names were around first and when did the most popular ones appear? How do the numbers show the adjustments in the trend?

I have compiled all –aiden names since data started being collected in 1880. Give or take a few (I cannot be 100% sure I captured them all, but I am confident I got most of them), there have been 383 names that rhyme with Aiden given to boys in the United States. If you combine the spellings of like names (think Playground Analysis), there have been 26, listed here by the most popular spelling of each name in the order of popularity (number of spelling variations):

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You know, you know, it’s Nameberry heresy.  But you just can’t help it.

You like Jayne better than Jane.  Prefer Aiden to Aidan, Katelyn to Caitlin.

We were tickled when we saw the forum started by Chrisco called Guilty Pleasure Spellings.  You know, those less-than-conventional spellings you prefer to the more classic versions.

We’re not talking about Steven over Stephen or Anne as opposed to Ann: Those are both correct and long-accepted.

But the much-maligned kree8tiv spellings that you know may be tacky or twisted, but dang it: You love it anyway.

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If you’re looking for a name with perfect symmetry and balance, nothing could fit the bill better than a palindromic appellation, meaning one that reads the same backwards and forwards. Granted, that’s a pretty limited field, and a lot of the choices begin and end with the letter ‘a’ with only one consonant in-between, but there are a few others as well. Here are the most usable:

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posted by: NameFreak! View all posts by this author

Kelli Brady, creator of NameFreak!, combined spelling variations to come up with the real top 50 names on the new US popularity list. Her results show some names vastly more popular than it seems and a new Number 1 and Number 2 for boys.

Some names might actually be more popular than the SSA list shows because it ranks each spelling of a name separately, rather than counting all spelling variations — Sophia and Sofia, for example — together. To see how popular a name actually is, I have gathered the various spellings of each name in the 2012 Top 1000 and come up with a new Top 50 for each gender!

Why do I call this the Playground Analysis? Well, when you are on the playground with your kids and you hear a name, you don’t know how it is spelled, but you do know how often you hear it.

For girls, the top 5 do not drastically change, but Zoey jumps from #20 to #7. Adalyn, Elena, Kaitlyn and Madelyn make huge gains after adding all of their various spellings.

Note: The main name listed is the spelling given to the most babies in 2012 (SSA Rank is in parentheses). The others are in alphabetical order. Opinions vary on how different spellings are pronounced. I went with my best judgment.

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QUESTION OF THE WEEK: Does a different spelling alter the image of a name?

We’re not talking about kreeatif spellings here, but standard variations. For example:

• Would Ann of Green Gables have seemed like a slightly different character? (She passionately advocated for the e at the end of her name, claiming it made it “so much more distinguished.”)
Do you see Catherine as more classic than Katherine?
• Is Isobel more exotic than Isabel?
Aiden more modern or American than Aidan?
Elisabeth softer than Elizabeth?
How about Susanna vs Susannah, Margo vs Margot, Mae vs May?

Any other examples you can think of where different spellings alter your perception of a name?

Click here to let us know what you think!

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