Category: Mardi Gras baby names

Mardi Gras Names with a French Accent

mardi gras baby names

By Linda Rosenkrantz

Come to Mardi Gras! If not for the party, then definitely for the colorful array of baby names.

Mardi Gras–aka Shrove Tuesday, aka Fat Tuesday—is just around the corner. The day before Ash Wednesday, it precedes the beginning of Lent, and nowhere is it celebrated more wildly than in and around the city of New Orleans where its carnival features street processions with fantastic floats, elaborate costumes and masks and brilliantly colored beads, fabulous food and jubilant jazzy music.

Which provides the raison d’etre for this look at the distinctive names from two endemic ethnic groups of the area: the French-speaking Cajuns, and the Creoles, descended from early French,  Spanish, Haitians and others.

Here are 20 of the mostly French-accented names widely heard in these regions of Louisiana and ready for wider use.

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posted by: Abby View all posts by this author

By Abby Sandel

Mardi Gras is tomorrow, and in New Orleans, that means one thing: a parade featuring Rex, King of Carnival.  Mardi Gras parades begin days earlier, and every parade organization – called a krewe – has its royalty.  But Rex and his Queen, along with their court of Maids, Dukes, and Pages, occupy a special place in the revels.

Rex traces its roots to 1872, and their royals have been drawn from the most prominent of New Orleans families.  The men named Rex are accomplished civic leaders; their consorts are chosen from the season’s debutantes.

Over the years, Rex and his court have worn some fascinating names – a mix of old Southern tradition and French influence.  Here are some of my favorites, drawn from decades of Mardi Gras’ reigning royals:

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Mardi Gras Names: Baby Names from the Bayou

Guest blogger Elisabeth Wilborn of You Can’t Call It “It”, a writer, artist, and mother who lives in Brooklyn, New York, brings us this look at the jambalaya of names native to the Louisiana Bayou.

An inspiration for everything from vampires to voodoo, from zydeco to the Krewe of Zulu, Louisiana has been a colorful melting pot of divergent cultures for centuries.  Cajuns from Canada, Creoles and others of Haitian, African, Italian, Spanish, or Native American descent, all come together to form a mélange of backgrounds, and in point of fact, names.  Most share a history of French language and Catholicism, even if it’s not by blood. While these may not be the choices in use today in the Bayou, they have been culled from historical documents, maps, and folklore from the late 18th to the early 20th centuries.  The majority are either French proper, or my favorite, Frenchified.  Still more trace their roots to Classical GrecoRoman civilization, deep Southern culture, or are somewhere farther afield and include a curious preponderance of the letter Z.

So come on!  Allez-y! Chew on these names (and some maque choux), prepare to bare all for those beads, and laissez les bon temps roulez!

LADIES

Acadia– The word Cajun itself has its origins in Acadian

Adelaide

Alexandrine

Alma

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