Category: long baby names

a Name Sage post by: Abby View all Name Sage posts

What do you do when you’ve created a baby name pattern, and now none of the names you love fits? Does your next baby break the mold, or does family unity carry the day?

Katie writes:

My due date is September 30 and we are expecting a girl, our fourth child!

We are feeling a bit stuck trying to find the perfect name to fit with siblings Jamison, Lillian Blake, and Rosewyn Cole, nicknames Jam, Lilly and Wynnie.

Names we’ve considered but still hesitate on are: Magdalen or Madeleine, Noah, Elouise, Lawson, and even Gable. Noah Madeleine is a favorite right now.

I unintentionally started something with the first three children. All three names end in n, are 7 letters long, and the girls both have flower names. The girls also have traditionally male middle names.

I’m finding it hard to pick a name that matches our previous criteria.

The Name Sage replies:

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Abby Berry Juice profile image

How Many Baby Names is Too Many?

a Name Sage post by: Abby View all Name Sage posts

Rosanna writes:

We’re expecting a baby boy, due in May, and our name crisis is twofold.

First of all, my partner and I are having a confidence crisis over the name we were previously set on – Leonardo, or Leo. We like Leo as a given name, but we’re not keen on shortened/nickname versions of a full name being put on the birth certificate. Leonardo would be there if our child wanted to use his full name later in life, and I liked how distinguished it sounds – and its catalogue of interesting namesakes!

However, I’m getting cold feet as we get closer to our due date. I’m starting to think that Leonardo is a bit of a mouthful and that we’d just never use it. The other name I would have used in a heartbeat is Theo/Theodore, but a co-worker recently used it for her baby boy, and I just don’t think I could use it for that reason.

There are only a few other names I like at this point. Oscar is one that my partner and I both like, but I don’t love it. And Lorcan is one that I really like, even love, but my partner isn’t keen on it at all!

The other part of our problem relates to middle names. We aren’t yet married, but have agreed that our baby will have both our surnames. We’d like to use Berry as a middle name, as it was my partner’s mother’s maiden name, and honors his much loved and missed grandparents. But I would also like our boy to have a first middle name – John – to honor my grandfather.

My partner thinks this would make our baby’s full name far too long, but I’m not so sure.

What do you think?

The Name Sage replies:

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By Abby Sandel

Looking at this week’s baby names in the news, you might think that parents are all about short names. We’ve heard high profile birth announcements for Edie and Della, Iyla and Poppy – no formal names required.

But it’s not that simple. Sure, Ava and Mia are in the current girls’ US Top 10. But so are Olivia and Isabella. Cheerful nickname Liam is the Number 2 name for boys, but classic William isn’t far behind.

For nearly every short name that’s trending upwards, there’s a longer possibility that’s also on the rise.

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By Abby Sandel, Appellation Mountain

For every Seraphina, there’s a Jax.

A glance at the US Top 100 lists from 1963 and 2013 suggests that the most popular names have gotten longer over the last fifty years.  Back in 1963, the only Top 100 name longer than three syllables was Elizabeth.

Today there are nine: Elizabeth is joined by Alexandra, Olivia, Gabriella, Isabella, Serenity, and Penelope for girls, plus Alexander and Jeremiah for boys.

There are more three-syllable names, and fewer single-syllable ones, too.

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Baby Boy Names: The long and short of it

boy baby names

by Pamela Redmond Satran

A friend is searching for baby boy names that start out long – three or more syllables long – and can be reduced to one-syllable nicknames.

If you’ve got a two-syllable last name, this is a good strategy. You end up with not one but two euphonic pairings.  And your child has the benefit of a proper, even imposing formal name as well as a short, friendly, accessible nickname.

Some stylish options for long baby boy names with short nicknames:

AbrahamAbe or Bram

AlexanderLex or Xan

Augustine or AugustusGus

Balthazar or Lazarus – Zar 

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