Category: international baby names

By Abby Sandel

If you’re expecting a daughter soon, the new most popular baby names stats for the US might be getting a lot of your attention lately.

Every year, it seems like more rarities are discovered. Calliope, Mavis, and Poppy joined the US Top 1,000. Once uncommon choices like Ophelia, Thea, and Wren all climbed more than 100 places in the rankings. Plenty of reliable traditional names, from Charlotte to Margaret, also gained in use.

Does that mean they’re unwearable? Not at all! But for parents seeking something truly unexpected, finding a great name will take some digging. We’ve got the rarest of the rare names here. But plenty of choices are slightly more familiar, while still remaining uncommon.

If you’re determined to find a name shared by only a handful of children, this list of 50 unusual girl names is a great starting point.

Every one of these names was given to fewer than 100 – and often, many less – girls born in the US last year. It took 263 births for a name to make the Top 1,000 in 2016. These names don’t even rank in the Top 2,000.

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12 Awesome Arabic Names

Arabic baby names

By John Kelly, MashedRadish

During Ramadan, the ninth month of the Islamic calendar, Muslims across the globe—about a quarter of the world’s population—fast from dawn to sunset for the month. Observance of the fast, which forms one of the Five Pillars of the Islam, helps Muslims get closer to Allah. As Muslims ready to mark Ramadan on May 26, let’s take a closer look at some awe-inspiring, and perhaps surprising, names that come from Arabic, the original language of the Koran and spoken by many millions of the faith.

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By Meredith Testa, namenculture

French names are perennially popular in the US, but there is still a host of undiscovered gems on the French popularity list. So today, the boys follow the girls we looked at the other day: 10 of the best possibilities for an unusual name taken from the popular names of France—all in the Top 100, including some imported from other cultures.

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By Meredith Testa

American parents have always seemed more attracted to French names for their daughters than their sons: from Julie in the 60s to Stephanie and Nicole and Danielle in the 80s to Charlotte today, it’s never difficult to find a French name near the top of the girls’ popularity chart.

But there remains a host of undiscovered possibilities from the French popularity list:

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By Lisa Spira

Before Liam became the second most popular baby name in the United States, as it has been since 2013, it was a lesser-known Irish short form of William. It was distinctively Irish. Today, however, Liam is so popular that it feels more “American” than anything else.

It’s not the first name to broaden in usage this way. In past generations, names such as Sean and Nicole became simply American, dissociated from their Irish and French roots, respectively.

Which names from other cultures might be the next popular American names?

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