Category: French baby names

By Meredith Testa

American parents have always seemed more attracted to French names for their daughters than their sons: from Julie in the 60s to Stephanie and Nicole and Danielle in the 80s to Charlotte today, it’s never difficult to find a French name near the top of the girls’ popularity chart.

But there remains a host of undiscovered possibilities from the French popularity list:

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Mardi Gras Names with a French Accent

mardi gras baby names

By Linda Rosenkrantz

Come to Mardi Gras! If not for the party, then definitely for the colorful array of baby names.

Mardi Gras–aka Shrove Tuesday, aka Fat Tuesday—is just around the corner. The day before Ash Wednesday, it precedes the beginning of Lent, and nowhere is it celebrated more wildly than in and around the city of New Orleans where its carnival features street processions with fantastic floats, elaborate costumes and masks and brilliantly colored beads, fabulous food and jubilant jazzy music.

Which provides the raison d’etre for this look at the distinctive names from two endemic ethnic groups of the area: the French-speaking Cajuns, and the Creoles, descended from early French,  Spanish, Haitians and others.

Here are 20 of the mostly French-accented names widely heard in these regions of Louisiana and ready for wider use.

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Who Knew Victor Hugo was a Name Nerd?

posted by: ClareB View all posts by this author

By Clare Bristow

Victor Hugo, the nineteenth-century French writer best known for Les Misérables and The Hunchback of Notre-Dame, was a keen observer of people and society. I’d wager he was something of a name enthusiast, too.

His books contain not just memorably-named characters, but also a lot of comments on names.

If someone has an unusual name, it usually has a back story. For example, Quasimodo, the Hunchback of Notre-Dame, was named after the first word in the liturgy on the day he was found as an infant.

Hugo’s characters talk about names, their own and others, just like we do in real life. In Notre-Dame, a group of women laugh at Esmeralda’s outlandish name (although they can hardly talk, with names like Amelotte, Colombe, Mahiette and Oudarde). Elsewhere, a man called Félix complains that his name is a lie because he is not happy.

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Lu-Girl Names Inspired by Paris

By Abby Sandel

What’s popular in Paris? When it comes to French baby names, Lou rules. Louise has held the top girls’ spot for eight years running, while Louis is a Top Ten pick for boys.

That tracks with the trend reports French baby name site Meilleurs Prenom’s Stephanie Rapoport has filed for Nameberry in recent years. Louis and Louise are in the nation-wide Top Ten for France, and other names, like Lilou and Louna, have been in favor, too.

At first glance, American parents have let this trend pass us by. But when Lu– names are added in, it’s a different story.

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unique girls' names

by Pamela Redmond Satran

Very feminine names that were unusual and exotic a generation or two ago have risen to the top of the US popularity lists: I’m looking at you, Isabella, Sophia, Olivia.

So what’s the parent to do who loves this kind of elaborate girls’ name but wants something a lot more rare?

Some of the best choices in this style don’t even make it onto the extended list of American baby names: All the names starred below were given to fewer than five baby girls in the US in the last year counted.  And the others were used for only a handful of babies.

Is Cassiopeia or Petronilla too much name for a baby girl (or even a grown-up woman, for that matter)? Maybe, but you can always call her Cassie or Nilla and trust she’ll grow into her august appellation, at least by the time she’s 40.

And if you like super-feminine names for girls, why stick with the safe Gabriellas and Valentinas when there are all these exotic beauties out there?

Thirty rare, feminine names you might consider for your little girl are:

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