Category: Boy Names

a Name Sage post by: Abby View all Name Sage posts

They’ve narrowed down names for Cora‘s brother, but they’re still feeling stuck! Is the best name already on their list, or is it time to start fresh?

Danika writes:

We are stuck! Our son is set to arrive in April, and we’re not in love with any of the names on our short list.

Our daughter’s name, Cora, felt right from the start. We’re not having the same feeling with any of our choices this time around.

I really like to use family names somewhere in the mix, and the meaning of names is important as well. Our daughter’s middle is Brewster, a family surname, and we’re considering Christopher, Cameron, Thornton, or Guy for a middle.

Some names we’ve considered:

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9 Ways to Name a Boy Now

By Abby Sandel

Expecting a son in 2017? Good news: there’s never been a better time to name a boy.

Not so long ago, we tended to save the more daring and downright interesting choices for girls, while we played it safe when naming our boys. Now, with every passing year, parents seem more and more likely to exercise creativity when naming their children, sons and daughters alike.

You can see it in the numbers. From 1900 to 1950, eight of the Top 20 boys’ names in the US remained unchanged. By 1975, six of them were still holding on. On the girls’ side, only Mary boasts that kind of record. Today, James and William remain near the top of the boys’ lists, but change is constant. Many of our current favorites were completely unknown a century ago.

Let’s take a look at nine ways to name a boy, inspired by baby naming headlines from recent months.

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By Linda Rosenkrantz

Benjamin was the only boy name to enter the Top 10 this year. But that didn’t signal a revival of B names—there wasn’t another one in the Top 60. So let’s give a little love to this neglected initial and look at 20 B names way beyond Brandon and Brayden that are waiting to be discovered.

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Cool Eurostyle Names for Boys

european boy names

by Pamela Redmond Satran

Nameberry has visitors from all over the world, which goes some way toward accounting for the fact that many of the names on our popularity list are more common in other countries than they are in the US. Of course, some American parents also search for international names to reflect their own ethnic heritage or to celebrate a culture or country they love or to find a more dashing way to honor Grandpa Frank.

Most of the names here, drawn from the names right below the most popular Top 1000, are European in origin and so evidence that sophisticated French or Italian or Scandinavian style. Or at least they do to the American ear, which relishes an accent.

There are also European-inflected names for boys higher up in the Nameberry popularity list: Callum and Enzo and Stellan, for instance. And in Europe itself, baby names originating in one country may be stylish in another, so that the Dutch like Italian names, the Italians favor Russian names, the Russians prefer French names, and the French are in love with British names. The boys’ names here are more distinctive than their popular brothers, but just as nimble at crossing international borders.

If you’re looking for an international name for your baby boy, these are the perfect blend of familiar yet exotic.

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By Pamela Redmond Satran

Kindergarten teachers across the US are learning the names of all their new students, which might present an especially big challenge this year.

Children entering school this fall were most likely born in 2010 or 2011, when the Number 1 names both years were Jacob for boys and Sophia for girls. (Even when Isabella took first place in 2010, Sophia and Sofia together outnumbered her.) That makes nearly 100,000 children named Jacob, Sophia, or Sofia starting kindergarten this fall, an average of 2000 in every state.

If you throw Jake and Sophie into the mix, that’s nearly as many children as were named Michael and Jennifer in 1983, the year today’s average kindergarten parent was born. Welcome to school, new generation of kids destined to be known as Jacob R. and Sophia W.

Other kindergarten students most likely to have a last initial appended to their popular first names are little boys named Ethan, William, and Jayden, and girls called Emma, Olivia, and Ava.

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