Category: boys’ baby names

Boys Baby Names: Spotlight on Oscar

By John Kelly

There’s a lot of Oscar buzz in the air. From the announcement of Academy Award nominees in mid January to the red-carpet ceremony in late February, we chatter about who will take home Tinseltown’s top trophies. But the name Oscar isn’t just the stuff of Hollywood legends, it turns out. Let’s have a closer look into this much celebrated, and much mythologized, name.

There are two main theories for the origin of the name Oscar. The first thinks Oscar comes from the Old English Osgar. This name literally means “god’s spear” or “divine spear,” conveying the sense of a “champion warrior.”

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Country Boy Names: The best of the west

We Americans love country names for our boys. Proof is in the current US Top 100: Wyatt and Ryder, Jackson and Hunter, Colton and Easton.

Some boys’ names feel country because of their associations, like Wyatt Earp or Johnny and June Carter Cash singing “Jackson.” Others bring to mind rodeo (Ryder) and the great outdoors (Hunter). Others are harder to pin down, but seem every bit as at home on a tractor or holding a fishing rod.

Country boy names fall somewhere between classic and modern. They’re rustic, but they wear almost as well in the big city as at home on the range.

Our picks for the best country boy names are:

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Boys’ Baby Names: Little Middles

By Linda Rosenkrantz

In the past, most boys were lucky enough to avoid the  generic-connector-middle-name syndrome the way girls did, when Ann and Lynn and Beth were pretty ubiquitous. For the most part, boy babies were given double classics, so there were a ton of them dubbed Steven Michael or Michael Steven, David Robert or Robert David.

Now, the middle name landscape for both genders has changed as more attention is being focused on them, to the point where firsts and middles have almost equal weight. Family names play a bigger part, for one thing, as do meaning and individuality–plus many parents are taking this place as a chance to let loose and be inventive .

Yet a strong, single-syllable middle is still often what’s called for, and so we’ve categorized for you some of the most interesting new-style possibilities—of course feel free to use this as a starting point.

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101 Fresh Subs for Top 10 Boy Names

posted by: Aimee Tafreshi View all posts by this author

By Aimee Tafreshi

Throughout my childbearing years, I curated a list of potential boys’ and girls’ names. In the boys’ camp, the list was glaringly short compared to the possibilities for team pink. When my first child—a girl—was born, I almost named her Brooke. But I loved the name Brooks even more, and given my perceived dearth of boys’ options, I was thrilled to bestow the name upon my second child, a boy. When it came to my youngest son, my favored names varied among stylish choices like Hudson and Emmett, classic picks like Henry, and names that I felt a connection with like Beech (husband said no way!) and Blaine (the winner!).

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Active Verb Baby Names for Leap Year Babies

By Abby Sandel

Happy Leap Day! There are more than 10,000 babies born every day in the United States, and around 360,000 born worldwide. If you’re celebrating the birth of a child today, he’ll grow up with the rarest of birthdays.

It would be tempting to name your new leapling – that’s the term used for anyone celebrating a birthday on February 29th – according to the calendar. Names that mean rare could work. A name that refers to the number four would be fitting, too.

But here’s another idea: since we refer to February 29th by the energetic name Leap Day, how about an active verb name for a son – or daughter – born today?

They range from Top 100 choices to retro names to rarities, but any one of these baby names would convey an energy and excitement that’s just right for a Leap Year baby.

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