Category: baby name popularity

By Linda Rosenkrantz

So you’ve come up with what you’re sure is a unique name for your baby. A Biblical/word/animal/place name no one else has thought of using. Right? Wrong! That special, singular, clever, utterly distinctive name that you imagine no one else has considered was actually used by as many as a few hundred other parents in the past year. Some have even already reached the Top 1000.

Here are 20 of these surprising names on the path to popularity.

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Top Baby Names: England and Wales, 2016

By Eleanor Nickerson

The top baby names for England and Wales in 2016 have been released by the Office of National Statistics, with the big news Olivia’s rise to claim the Number 1 spot for girls.

And once again Oliver was top for boys, for the fourth year, while reigning queen Amelia was ousted from her throne of five years by Olivia.

The Top 10 itself hasn’t changed much, although Lily has replaced Poppy and Muhammad replaced William.

The new additions to the top 100 are Albie, Arlo, Ezra, Finn, Jasper and Jesse for boys; Felicity, Iris, Luna and Lydia for girls.

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Playing it Safe Baby Names

a Name Sage post by: Abby View all Name Sage posts

They have a shortlist for their first child, but they’re torn. Do they use a long-time favorite? Stick with something more classic? Or start from scratch?

L. writes:

We are expecting our first baby later this year, a girl, and we are stuck on names.

For many years, I thought I would name my future daughter Chloe. My husband is okay with Chloe, but Olivia is his current favorite. I also like Olivia, but I’m not sure it’s “the one.”

We’ve also considered Whitley (but my husband doesn’t like it), Lauren, and Kinsley. When I read comments about the name Kinsley, it is mostly negative. Could I pull off a name I like but others will hate? Will I regret not using Chloe? Do I play it safe with Olivia? Go classic with Lauren?

I have read countless name lists and I go round and round with this same handful of names. Popular Nameberry suggestions such as Margot, Clementine, and Eliza don’t appeal to me.

Please help!

The Name Sage replies:

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By Clare Bristow

Popularity isn’t what it used to be. That’s something that’s said a lot in baby name discussions, usually to reassure parents that even if they choose one of the top names in the country, their child (probably) won’t be one of seven Emmas or Noahs in their class. The statistics show that, year after year, the most popular names are being given to a smaller and smaller percentage of children.

The flipside of this is that unusual names aren’t what they used to be, either.

With the pool of names no longer dominated by a few top names as it was in past generations, more children are given names that they don’t share with many people. In some communities, having a name that stands out is the norm.

That’s what these parents found. Some people have trouble with their son’s name, Hazen, but over time they’ve realised that his non-traditional name fits right in with those of his classmates. They include Jet, Rig, Bliss and Reign.

Here are some more new-normal names from the news this week.

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By Linda Rosenkrantz

In 1789, when George Washington was unanimously elected the first president of the nation—the first elected president in the world– there was a lot of discussion about what he should be called. John Adams and others favored royal titles such as Your Highness and Your Majesty, even His Exalted Highness. Washington himself was said to be relieved when the humbler President was settled on.

How astonished would George be today if he could flash forward and see all the American babies being given those very exalted regal titles he rejected? This trend is not limited to pop royalty either: numerous titles from the British peerage and other international kingdoms, as well as words related to them, are being bestowed by all parents on their little heirs. Some of these royal baby names are already in the Top 1000–let’s take a look at those first.

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