Category: baby name Olivia

a Name Sage post by: Abby View all Name Sage posts

They’ve already used their favorite name – for the dog! She’s working on finding some fresh ideas, but he’s still stuck on Olivia. What might satisfy them both?

Megan writes:

My husband and I are expecting our first baby in early August – a girl!

We are trying to decide on the perfect name. My husband has fallen in love with Olivia.

The problem? We already used the perfect name. For our dog, Olivia.

We are a cross-cultural couple, so we hope to choose an English first name and a Turkish middle. I like (and my husband tolerates) Lyla, Linden, Marlow, and Sienna.

For Turkish names, we are considering Azize (pronounced A-zi-zay), Kaya, Mina (Meena), and Lale (la-lay).

My top name is either Lyla Azize, or maybe Linden. My husband prefers Olivia Lale.

Could you please give us some suggestions for this baby so she doesn’t end up being named after the dog?

The Name Sage replies:

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a Name Sage post by: Abby View all Name Sage posts

 She says vintage; her partner prefers something more mainstream. Where’s the sweet spot?

Emma writes:

My partner and I are expecting our first together in less than two months! My partner has two daughters already; Olivia Sadie and Lucy Elena and I’ve got another Penelope Tilda. We’re team green, but I have a feeling it’s a girl (which probably means it’s a boy!)

For a boy, we are pretty sure on Hugo. The Hu- part is the first two letters of my MIL‘s maiden name (Hunter), and the -go are the first two letters of my mum’s maiden name (Gordon).

We’re having a lot more trouble with girl’s names. DP’s top name is Ava, which seems too popular. Her second top name is Evelyn, but it’s my goddaughter’s name, and I feel it’s too close for comfort.

My top name is Martha. DP hates it. My second choice would be Dorothy. DP finds it too vintage, and can’t get away from the Wizard of Oz association.

We do both love Felicity and Cecily, but our surnames are very ‘s’ heavy. We like, but don’t love Daphne, Elowen, Georgia, Rowena, Juliet, Delilah, Audrey, Eleanora, Vivian, Marina, Cora, and Arabelle.

Could you please give us some suggestions for this baby, if it’s a girl? Or even just tell us we’re being stupid and we’ve already looked over our perfect name!

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Girl Names: In Love with Olivia

By Abby Sandel

Not only has Olivia been a Top Ten favorite for the entire twenty-first century, it’s currently the second most popular name for girls born in the US, just a tick behind Emma.

If you’re in love with Olivia, but aren’t wild about your daughter sharing her name, here’s a solution: seventeen gorgeous girl names, all starting with O and ending in –ia. But not a one of these cracks the current US Top 100. In fact, most of these names fall far outside of the Top 1000.

Instead of Olivia, consider:

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posted by: Aimee Tafreshi View all posts by this author

By Aimee Tafreshi

In our modern world, how do you determine the perfect baby name for your offspring? TV characters, nature words, place names, superheroes—not many inspirations are off-limits when it comes to thinking of names. Many parents cut through the slush pile by leaning on tradition or personal preference. Yet, not surprisingly, there are names that remain insanely popular each year, and the poured-your-heart-and-soul-into-it pick that sounded so original suddenly blends in like vanilla with the masses.

For those seeking a new twist, I have picked some of the most popular girls’ names from the Social Security Administration’s list and offered some alternatives that tend to be overlooked. . Some may share the same first letter or sound with the original name inspiration, while others may simply evoke a similar vibe or impression.

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By Linda Rosenkrantz

Many girls’ names come in two forms: a straightforward version ending in e and a more romantic variation with a final a. And these tend to move in and out of fashion as a group, reflecting the tenor of the time.

Right now, we are in a relatively elaborate era, with few parents picking girls’ names like Julie over Julia or Diane over Diana.

But I have a hunch that we’re moving into a more evenly divided time, with the rising of names like Olive and Sophie and Sylvie.

Let’s take a look at some more examples.

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