Category: baby name Autumn

By Clare Bristow

This week’s news includes names damaged by hurricanes, baby names fit for a prince or princess, matchy first and middle names, and how to handle reactions to your child’s name. 

Hurricane names: The fall of Harvey, Katrina, and Irma

Hurricanes are so destructive on lives and property that it may seem silly to be concerned their negative effect on baby names, but perhaps not to people with the name Katrina, Sandy, and now Harvey and Irma. Use of the name Katrina fell by 85 percent after the terrible hurricane that struck New Orleans in 2005. Now the baby name Harvey, which was just coming back into style in the US after a nearly 70-year downturn, is likely to face the same negative fate. And the name Irma is not even going to get her shot, if she ever had one. Sandy was popular enough for long enough that it may escape over-identification with the storm of that name. But anyone named Katrina, Harvey, and Irma will be plagued by hurricane jokes for many years to come.

Royal baby names: Britain and Sweden

You’ve probably heard that William and Catherine, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, are expecting their third child. The world is already placing bets on what George and Charlotte’s little brother or sister will be called.

The best analysis I’ve read is Elea’s predictions – the top contenders include Alice and Arthur. From everything we know about the royal couple, we wouldn’t expect anything outrageous, so the odds of them calling their baby Brexit or Daenerys are roughly zero.

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We are particularly pleased to reprint this article by the distinguished name scholar, Cleveland Evans; it originally appeared on Omaha.com.

By Cleveland Evans

The weather bureau says summer starts June 1 — and temperatures in Omaha this June show they have a point. Astronomers say summer started when the sun reached its annual highest place in the sky at 5:34 p.m. Monday.

Summer” goes back millennia to “sem,” the word for summer in ancient Indo-European.  Though not as ancient, “winter” also goes back thousands of years, to a Germanic word which probably meant “wet season.”

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Seasonal Baby Names: How do they rank?

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seasonal names

By Kelli Brady, Name Freak!

I love the autumn season. I MISS the autumn season. Living in Thailand for the past couple of years, I have not experienced fall in all its glory and I miss it. This time of year brings thoughts of the colorful season, and those thoughts inevitably turn to names (of course). What’s the history with the seasons as given names? How have WinterSpring, Summer and Autumn fared over the years?

It’s probably no surprise that Autumn has been the most widely used season name since 1880. But here are some things that you may not know…

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TBy Abby Sandel, Appellation Mountain

Choosing a great baby name is a little bit like putting together a puzzle.

This week’s baby names in the news – and my, it was a busy week – all share a certain pattern.

Start with a recognizable, but not too popular, two-syllable name.

Add a middle, or even two.  Don’t fret about rhythm and flow, especially if you’re honoring a loved one or extolling a virtue.

Now calibrate.  If the first name is common, make sure the middle name is a real surprise.

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Since the Fall season is officially upon us, it’s time once again for an update of our annual round-up of crisp Autumn names–those appellations which refer to the season directly and those that are more subtle references.

Autumn — Autumn is ironically the hottest season name once again this year, the only one in the Top 100 where it’s maintained its status for over a decade now.  The name Autumn first entered the U.S. Top 1000 in 1969, inspired by the hippie nature names and word names.  While it’s still attractive, however, it’s hardly fresh. (Note: Winter is also in the air—though it hasn’t yet made the list, we’re seeing more and more interest in it as a name.)

Names from other cultures that provide a newer route to Autumn include the Japanese girls’ names Aki and Akiko, the Turkish girls’ name Hazan, the Vietnamese Thu, and, in Chinese, Qiu for either girls or boys.

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