Category: baby girl names

By Abby Sandel

Let’s say you love old-fashioned girl names with a tailored quality. You’re all about names that topped the charts a century ago, but feel fresh and modern today.

Top Ten Charlotte fits this description. The same is true of fast-rising Evelyn and Eleanor.

The only problem, of course, is that you might already know a few Violets and Graces. Or you worry that your Lillian will be lost in a crowd of girls with similar names.

What’s the solution? Look for the next wave of new old girl names, of course!

To make this list, I focused on names that previously charted in the US Top 100. So Winifred and Millicent and Sybil failed the test. Any name ending in an ‘a’ was ruled out, too. Good-bye to Lucinda, Luella, and Viola!

Plenty of possibilities remained. They’re feminine, but not too elaborate. Vintage describes them well, and yet parents aren’t using them in big numbers. None of the choices on this list appear in the current US Top 1000, either – at least not as of 2015, the most current data available from the US Social Security Administration.

If you’re crushed that your favorite old-fashioned girls’ name is on everybody else’s list, too, these names might be for you.

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Okay, this might be a little premature, since the royal couple isn’t even married yet, let alone pregnant. But at Nameberry, it’s never too early to start offering our ideas.

There are certain limits, however, for even though Princess Anne named her daughter Zara, and Queen Elizabeth’s first great-grandchild was recently christened the Americanized Savannah, it’s pretty doubtful that Prince William and Princess-to-be Kate Middleton will go that far afield for the name of their first son or daughter.  More than likely, they’ll reach back into royal history—but because British rulers typically use three or four middle names, they could slip in something less conventional for third or fourth choice. Not surprisingly, there’s more wiggle room for girls than boys.

Putting aside the most obvious options—such as Queen Mum and Grandmum name Elizabeth (also the middle name of Catherine Middleton herself) and Victoria and Mary and Anne, the royal couple would be staying within the prescribed lines if they considered any of the following names from British royal history:

Adelaide. The capital city of South Australia was named for the beloved 19th century British “Good QueenAdelaide,” the wife of William IV, and could be an appropriate choice for a 21st century “Good Princess Adelaide.”

Alexandrina.  This unusual member of the ‘Alex” family of names was actually the real first name of QueenVictoria, and would make an interesting and unusual pick, even though five syllables is a bit much, especially when followed by several other appellations

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